542 reputation
57
bio website fennecfoxen.org
location San Jose, CA
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Aug 29 '13 at 19:58

Hi.


Jun
7
awarded  Pundit
Feb
4
comment Why does automated testing keep failing in my company?
Writing the right object is easy. Discovering some subtle difference between what you've told your ORM's validation layer and the database constraints: that's Interesting. :)
Feb
4
comment Why does automated testing keep failing in my company?
All well and good until you're unit-testing the code that manipulates the database. :P which, for a lot of people, is a lot of their code.
Feb
4
comment Why does automated testing keep failing in my company?
Hard-coding database return values from a little stub of a mock object is a good way to insulate the test from anything in the database which could change and break the code (e.g. column renames). It's appropriate under certain circumstances, but an easy-to-use temporary testing database is important to keep around unless you want things to break someday when you change it. If your code breaks when you swap out the database, that's a fault of the code that the test should be catching (and if you want to avoid that, you'll want to run the test suite under multiple databases.)
Feb
4
answered Why does automated testing keep failing in my company?
Sep
19
comment Basic web architecture : Perl -> PHP
You have a flexible-schema data store for serializing arbitrary objects? That's cool, but the question you should be asking yourself is whether there's anything it does that MongoDB doesn't already do better.
Sep
19
comment Authentication for users on a Single Page App?
ElYusubov, you have my words of explanation. It is now entirely up to you to decide whether to take them into consideration and attempt to understand why someone might find your answer to be downvote-worthy, or reject them in a defensive manner. Do what you will. I honestly don't care which you do; I won't be arguing the opinion anymore, and generally won't be paying attention to any further comment which you make here.
Sep
19
comment Authentication for users on a Single Page App?
Since you ask, this was downvoted (by someone else) because he asked about a bunch of technical best-practices on integrating multi-login systems and authenticating API requests and you commented with "I think you should use this authentication method to free your users instead!" which is certainly a legitimate opinion for you to have about a high-level approach, but doesn't really even begin to answer any of his technical questions, and is also in contradiction to his stated goals.
Sep
17
awarded  Yearling
Feb
29
comment why do some job posts say “high pressure environment”?
From what I gather, if you're working in something like high-frequency trading (which is controversial but whatever) then there are business requirements for fast turnaround times but high demands on your code's quality.
Feb
1
comment Is there an alternative to bits?
It is impossible to uniquely represent an infinite number of different floats. You would need to store an infinite amount of information to uniquely identify a single infinifloat, which can't be done in a finite amount of space because physics. Information storage in excess of a certain amount in a given volume requires a density such that the contents would be gravitationally crushed to MAX_DENSITY in finite time, even if they can travel at MAX_SPEED (better known as 'the speed of light'): a black hole. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bekenstein_bound for the CompSci implications.
Sep
18
awarded  Yearling
Jul
15
awarded  Good Answer
Mar
11
awarded  Taxonomist
Jan
14
comment When is optimization not premature and therefore not evil?
Yeah... It's all well and good to shave 90% off the time a random function call takes, but maybe you'd get a bigger impact by looking at the code where your app actually spends 80% of its time and shaving off a few percent there.
Dec
24
comment How do you look for programmers when your project's not in a particularly popular language?
In general, we don't allow regular work-from-home because we're an XP team that does pair programming (which is hard enough to do with our one remote developer who had been with us for years already) and the benefits that it offers us, especially the collaboration and communication, are greatly reduced with remote developers. That said, we're in Sunnyvale, with Silicon Valley is at our doorstep, so it's not like there's a shortage of local talent. I suppose it would be nice if we were closer to San Francisco... or at least to Caltrain... but my influence in those matters is minimal.
Dec
24
comment How do you look for programmers when your project's not in a particularly popular language?
By "not particularly impressive" I don't just mean the background, I mean that they fail the little quiz we send asking for them to program simple things, like a 'singleton' base class. (And we're pretty liberal with the people we quiz.)
Dec
24
asked How do you look for programmers when your project's not in a particularly popular language?
Dec
22
comment Is anything in programming truly evil?
Guns don't kill people. Bullets do. :)
Dec
13
comment Which things instantly ring alarm bells when looking at code?
Hmm. printf("%c", 7) typically rings alarm bells for me. ;)