9,538 reputation
12042
bio website en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
location United States
age 70
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen 2 days ago

BS Mechanical Engr.
PhD CS(AI)
CS Prof (4yr)
Numerous consulting jobs.
15 yr at http://www.pharsight.com
Published book on CS & several articles
4 kids, 2 grand
Pilot(student)

P.S. The picture is a Beta-prime distribution. It shows the program speedup factors you can get if you see a problem twice in 2, 3, 4, and 5 samples.


Dec
28
awarded  Necromancer
Dec
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
28
comment What's the most used programming language in high performance computing? And why?
@Omega: You're right. The Fortran-taught folks tend to have no concept of formatting, loathe "implicit none", and cram the code together because they still deal with 72-character lines and think making understandable code is for wimps. The CS-taught people create monster pyramids of classes laced with polymorphisms, notifications, and abstractions, when something simple would do the job. So they deserve each other :)
Dec
27
comment Is there any reason to use “plain old data” classes?
@Konrad: I prefer the concept of information, not state, as the alternative to data, because then we can look at data as an (ideally minimal) encoding of the information, and understand its purpose as the retention of information for the time lag between its entrance to the channel and its exit.
Dec
27
revised Is there any reason to use “plain old data” classes?
deleted 11 characters in body; edited body
Dec
27
comment Is there any reason to use “plain old data” classes?
++ Amen. See my answer.
Dec
27
revised What's the most used programming language in high performance computing? And why?
added 33 characters in body
Dec
27
answered What's the most used programming language in high performance computing? And why?
Dec
27
answered Is there any reason to use “plain old data” classes?
Dec
26
comment Compiler optimization examples
I have a problem with the premise. I don't mind the compiler doing a good job of streamlining code, but personally I don't want a compiler trying to be smarter than me. I want it to do what it's told. It's job is to generate assembly language so that I don't have to. If I want to write stupid code, I don't want it to try and fix it for me. Often, I have a reason for writing it the way I do, and it don't want it rearranged. So maybe optimization is a fine option, but I fail to see the real value of it.
Dec
26
answered JIT compiler for C, C++, and the likes
Dec
21
comment Absolute statements in IT that are wrong
++ I'm an A1 pest on this subject. So much stupid stuff is said about it, and so very few people actually know what they're talking about. They say "measure measure". They say "get the right algorithm", all of which totally misses the point. The point is to actually do performance tuning and in the process learn what approaches to take, and what well-known and recommended practices to avoid.
Dec
21
comment Is anything in programming truly evil?
@Jas: @John: I might add, on these fine points, an Oscar Wilde quote: "As long as war is regarded as wicked, it will always have its fascination. When it is looked upon as vulgar, it will cease to be popular." I wonder if the wicked/vulgar distinction has a parallel in immoral/evil.
Dec
21
comment Is anything in programming truly evil?
@John: Robin Hood? I know what you mean. In fact, Pareto Efficiency is all about that, I think. It's the opposite of popular theory today. OMG, I hope this doesn't start a flame war...
Dec
21
comment Is anything in programming truly evil?
@Jon: ... and in this season everybody knows "naughty" and "nice" go together :)
Dec
21
answered Is anything in programming truly evil?
Dec
21
comment Is anything in programming truly evil?
++ I second your rant. Bravo!
Dec
17
awarded  Autobiographer
Dec
14
awarded  Enthusiast
Dec
9
awarded  Nice Answer