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Oct
2
answered I am in a rather difficult work situation. Should I stay or should I go?
Oct
2
revised What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
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Oct
2
revised What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
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Oct
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revised What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
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Oct
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revised What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
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Oct
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revised What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
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Oct
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revised What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
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Oct
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revised What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
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Oct
1
answered What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
Sep
27
comment Is Java “dead in the water” as a consequence of Oracle buying Sun and subsequently suing Google
@Dean J: Well, my examples are DAO, Fortran, and C/C++. We built a product, using a 3rd-party grid control, based on DAO, and the programmers move on. Whattayaknow - MS tries to rip it out from under us. Fortran (not that I like it): try to stick with one compiler - you can't, you gotta keep buying new ones, 'cause the old ones don't work with customers' new machines. Same for C and C++. But what if I don't WANNA do .net? What if I LIKE VC? Too ****ing bad, soldier.
Sep
27
comment Is Java “dead in the water” as a consequence of Oracle buying Sun and subsequently suing Google
@Dean J: That's good. I'm thinking of how IBM used to trap people with EBCDIC and special-format punch cards, while DEC had simple ASCII-stream IO, very simple, that didn't trap anybody. Then DEC got big, and they started trying to lock people in with fancy terminals with special codes. Then I think of Microsoft, and the series of compilers, databases, etc. they try to trap people into. If Sun & Oracle are resisting the temptation to corner a revenue stream, great. I'm sure they've got marketing staff asking "Why are we doing this?"
Sep
25
revised Why isn't functional programming more popular in the industry? Does it catch on now?
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Sep
25
answered Why isn't functional programming more popular in the industry? Does it catch on now?
Sep
24
answered Is Java “dead in the water” as a consequence of Oracle buying Sun and subsequently suing Google
Sep
23
answered How do I evaluate if writing a book, article, or presenting at conference is worth it?
Sep
23
comment How do you dive into large code bases?
+1 Yeah, that's what I do too, but I don't know of any way to make the job easy. In my experience, it can take weeks before I feel safe making any changes, and months before I'm "at home" in the code. It certainly helps if you can ask questions of the developers.
Sep
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
22
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Sep
20
answered How to improve the code writing effort?