343 reputation
27
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Jun 9 '11 at 3:02

Engineering Manager for a medium sized software group in Brisbane, Australia.

Also a photographer, musician, and parent.


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
27
awarded  Yearling
Oct
17
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
8
awarded  Scholar
Jun
8
accepted How can we make agile enjoyable for developers that like to personally, independently own large chunks from start to finish
Jun
1
comment How can we make agile enjoyable for developers that like to personally, independently own large chunks from start to finish
thanks for your answer. I think in at least one case we are gravitating towards your last suggestion when we can. We have to think about how the off-to-the-side project by a single person doesn't derail a lot of the community ownership we have developed, but that seems to be worth it.
Jun
1
comment How can we make agile enjoyable for developers that like to personally, independently own large chunks from start to finish
@S.Lott: Yep, agree completely - have spent time (a lot of time) with the people to understand how they feel. In many cases, they see the system working better for the majority now, and they see the benefits; they don't see that it needs to be fixed. They just might not see their place in it any more. If the right thing for someone is to work somewhere else, sad as it makes me, I'll support them. I guess I'm looking for insight in to how others have adjusted, what new or different things motivate them, so we have a few more tools to work with. (Thanks for the time and answer btw, appreciated.)
Jun
1
comment How can we make agile enjoyable for developers that like to personally, independently own large chunks from start to finish
Hi - my intent was not related to seeing one's code hacked about by the rest of the team. I have seen the "What have you done to my code!! Aargh!" thing a few times, in waterfall and in agile, but that's a different issue. It's about people that find they aren't able to take a piece of work and work independently to finish it.
Jun
1
comment How can we make agile enjoyable for developers that like to personally, independently own large chunks from start to finish
Perhaps I should have stated the problem differently. We now have teams that have self-organised and evolved to work quite differently than before, and on occasion individuals within the team no longer feel rewarded in the way they used to. Primarily this seems to come from the higher level of interaction between team members, the shared goals teams have, the way teams own their problems as a collective. If it were as simple as moving folks to another team that suited the way they wanted to work, that would be easy, but across the board teams are working this way.
Jun
1
comment How can we make agile enjoyable for developers that like to personally, independently own large chunks from start to finish
We don't expect to put our pens down some day and say "yay, our transition is complete, we work like this now", because we expect it to evolve forever. In every case where a developer struggles to enjoy work, they are surrounded by others that now enjoy work more. Teams are empowered to solve problems themselves, self organise to sort things out in the way they think is best. It has been remarkable to see how people react to this. "We can't go agile! It would mean we'd need to invest all this time in to blah, and get blah sorted out, and that's going to cost!" "It is? Ok, go for it." ...
Jun
1
comment How can we make agile enjoyable for developers that like to personally, independently own large chunks from start to finish
I'm absolutely certain we are doing some things wrong. We don't consider agile to be a set of rules that you must apply a certain way to be right. We've made decisions to ditch certain constraints we used to have, and have done everything in our power to put teams together, give them a job to do, give them some boundaries to work within, and leave them alone to do it. Of course there are constraints we have to deal with; for example, teams that produce material that other teams depend on. As much as possible, we make these sorts of problems something for the teams to solve. ...
Jun
1
awarded  Good Question
Jun
1
awarded  Teacher
Jun
1
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
1
answered Moving from a traditional waterfall methodology to an agile one
Jun
1
awarded  Supporter
Jun
1
awarded  Student
Jun
1
asked How can we make agile enjoyable for developers that like to personally, independently own large chunks from start to finish