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Dec
10
comment Requirements and Documentation in Agile
Sorry, I didn't mean to make any hair on the back of the next stand up. I only mean to say that I have never encountered a client who is willing to go into a new custom software project without a good-faith estimate that allows them to see a clear ROI. IMHO it's an understandable fact of doing business.
Dec
10
comment Should the story points of stories created after splitting a story add up to the number of story points of that story?
@herman I have seen this implied in various places, but I think, at best, it's no longer accepted and provably false. Human beings just don't estimate that way, and so that's not the result you get. I posed this very same issue with our local Agile SIG a few months back, and all of the more-experienced folks in the room chimed in and agreed that story points consistently had a non-linear (typical exponential) relationship with hours. In that moment I suddenly realized I should have been using T-shirt sizes instead of points all this time :)
Dec
10
comment are technical user stories allowed in scrum
@JeffO is exactly right. Even those stories should be phrased in the context of the value to the user so that they are prioritized and assessed accordingly. Without doing so you could easily lose sight of the fact that you don't yet have enough load to warrant load-balancing, so the story can be put off for a few months until the sales team works a little harder ;) Mike Cohn talks about this in the book Suceeding with Agile.
Dec
10
comment Requirements and Documentation in Agile
the reason clients typically don't accept this is they want to know the final cost of the software package before paying for it. Put yourself in their shoes...on one hand they could buy CSC's FooWorks for $250K; on they other hand they could have you develop a custom package for ... oh wait how much will it cost? Basically saying "we'll be done when you tell us we're done" is never an acceptable answer because the customer has to make a hard trade-off decision regarding ROI. If you were buying a house vs. building new, would you accept not knowing the cost to build?
Dec
10
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Dec
10
comment What happens if Sprint Goal is not met?
@tibo You're right, but I think he can be forgiven for the suggestion... unfortunately I've seen quite a few primers on agile and scrum that make it sound like you're supposed to throw out the baby with the bathwater on a failed sprint. It's just bad authorship and honest misunderstandings, but unfortunately this confusion persists.
Dec
10
revised What happens if Sprint Goal is not met?
Typo - s/times/teams
Dec
10
comment What happens if Sprint Goal is not met?
@steven-burnap answered your question well, but I want to point back to the large story as a likely root cause of the issue here. One of the most common problems i see in Agile implementations is not learning how to break stories into smaller parts. It's very hard and requires lots of experience and creativity. It should be exceptionally rare (a few times per year) that you let a story be so large that it endangers a sprint. Some of Mike Cohn's books are really helpful in learning how to decompose a story.
Dec
10
suggested approved edit on What happens if Sprint Goal is not met?
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