338 reputation
19
bio website dalkescientific.com/writings
location Gothenburg, Sweden
age
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Sep 22 '13 at 15:15

Aug
8
comment Is it possible to escape the GPL by deriving the same work from multiple sources?
The statement "In theory, if you took a 10,000 line GPL file, deleted all but the first line, and wrote arbitrary code after it, you'd still be bound by the GPL." is not correct. There is a de minimus exception in copyright law, and a requirement for some sort of creativity. If the first line is "/*" then it meets neither criteria. Best real-world example is BSD Unix, derived from AT&T Unix, but (eventually) changed enough that it was no longer under the AT&T copyright. However, be prepared for a lawsuit should that happen. This is why it's generally safer to do a cleanroom implementation.
Mar
26
awarded  Tumbleweed
Mar
20
comment Fastest way to find the closest point
Thanks. "randomly moving" is not enough of a clarification. How is it random? I outlined an optimization you can do with "randomly moving" points, if there's an upper bound on the motion. To repeat, if there's no upper bound then there's nothing better than a linear search. At that point it's just a matter of optimizing your Python code, which you haven't shown.
Mar
20
answered What endpoints should I provide, if any, to permit connectivity testing for my web services?
Mar
20
answered Fastest way to find the closest point
Mar
20
answered How many `malloc` calls is too many? If any?
May
8
awarded  Yearling
Dec
18
comment Do you have to include a license notice with every source file?
And of the 200 files in the top-level Python standard library, only 34 contain the word "copyright", and only 4 of those are for the Python Software Foundation, which controls the copyright to Python.
Dec
18
comment Do you have to include a license notice with every source file?
Point taken. I know now one paragraph about MELT. In general it's best that generated files include the copyright notice as it's very hard to "attach" the license otherwise. Eg, "yacc" and "lex" are restricted in what they can do.
Dec
18
comment Do you have to include a license notice with every source file?
@Emmad: No, a court would not say they are identical. (But they might be "essentially identical".) Yes, a court would say it's copyright infringement.
Dec
18
comment Do you have to include a license notice with every source file?
It can't be mandatory because there are systems, like Smalltalk images, which don't express source code as files. They say "safest" and "should", not "must." What they recommend is an easily understood guideline with little chance of someone making an error, but it is definitely not "practically mandatory."
Dec
18
comment How to go about “taking over” an open-source project?
It used to be that forks were considered bad. It was always seen as best to contact the original developer and be polite. The githib philosophy is that forks are cheap and everyone should fork. After all, under a DVCS, everything is a fork. Hence why you see these different views.
Dec
18
awarded  Editor
Dec
18
revised Is Java free software?
link to the Wikipedia page on the license on Sun (now Oracle's) Java license
Dec
18
suggested approved edit on Is Java free software?
Dec
18
answered Do you have to include a license notice with every source file?
Nov
30
comment Is browser fingerprinting a viable technique for identifying anonymous users?
Mor, your statement "at best it can uniquely identify a Computer" is incorrect. At its best it can distinguish between different accounts on the same computer. If it's a networked account then it may be possible to distinguish between two different accounts on the same network. That multiple people can use the account is a different matter.
Nov
29
awarded  Critic
Nov
29
comment Is browser fingerprinting a viable technique for identifying anonymous users?
Fingerprinting can indeed identify even different accounts on the same machine. I know English, Swedish, and some Spanish. I've configured my Mac accordingly. When Firefox requests a page it sends "Accept-Language: en-us,en;q=0.8,sv;q=0.5,es;q=0.3". My wife does not know any Spanish. Firefox on her account on the same machine doesn't include the "es" term. Quite clearly this something you say isn't possible.
Aug
4
awarded  Nice Question