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Jul
14
answered My coworker commits and pushes without testing
Jul
14
comment My coworker commits and pushes without testing
Not only do you have the backups, but also can your business afford the downtime while a restoration is done? And can it afford to lose minutes, hours, or even days of information because a rollback of the database had to be performed? I'd say in almost all nontrivial cases, the answer is a resounding 'no'. And even in trivial cases, you don't want 'restore a backup' to be how you deal with untested code getting checked in. There has to be something that ensures that testing happens between when code is checked in and when it reaches production.
Jul
14
comment My coworker commits and pushes without testing
This only works with an office. What's the equivalent concept for when you have a distributed team of remote developers who all work from home?
Jul
4
comment Is testable code better code?
@Telastyn - But that's anecdotal. My own anecdotal experience over the past 10 years is that 3 out of 4 companies don't care (that much) about unit tests. Of course, the 3 that cared least were startups, and the one that did was a much larger tech company (although even then, there was no company-wide mandate for tests; it was something that my Scrum team decided to include in its 'definition of done', because we cared, regardless of the company's policy or lack thereof).
Jul
3
comment Is testable code better code?
"Not having unit tests means you're not done with your code/feature" - Untrue. The "definition of done" is something that the team decides. It may or may not include some degree of test coverage. But nowhere is there a strict requirement that says a feature cannot be "done" if there are no tests for it. The team may choose to require tests, or they may not.
Jul
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
7
comment Can GPL licensed code be close sourced later by the author?
All the answers here basically say the same thing, but if anyone has the correct answer it's @paxdiablo. Regardless of what the GPL says or does not say, pulling back code that has been released under any open-source license is legally questionable and practically impossible. Even if the license explicitly reserves the right to do so. Once the code is out there, it's out there. That's a gray area, if you ask me.
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
13
comment Is there anything groundbreaking about NoSQL?
"my understanding is that NoSQL is rather arbitrary" - My understanding is that for all the hype it's basically a persistent HashMap. Which is useful in many cases, but not generally sufficient in and of itself. Think of it as sideband storage for things that don't benefit from being stored in a relational way.
Jul
4
comment How does the “Fourth Dimension” work with arrays?
I think your first sentence is actually backwards. Programs are limited by the physical constraints of the hardware they run on. And memory is flat. Programming languages may allow arrays to be specified in terms of arbitrarily many dimensions, but really all that happens is the provided numbers are multiplied together and you get a flat list of however many things you actually asked for. Some math is used to handle addressing into the flat list based upon multi-dimensional indices, but it's still a flat list. The dimensions are entirely illusory.
May
18
awarded  Yearling
May
18
awarded  Yearling
May
16
awarded  Enlightened
May
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
16
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
8
comment Loop fusion example using aspect-oriented framework
From what I can gather, it kind of seems like implementing loop fusion using aspects is a horrendous misuse of aspects.
Jan
8
comment Do coding puzzles make good interview questions
@MartijnVerburg - But if all you need is a web UI for Payroll then why hire a new employee for that in the first place? If that's the only development/coding that needs to be done you might as well just farm it out to a consultant. But if that's not the only engineering work that needs doing, it seems presumptuous to assume that the candidate will never encounter a challenging problem that requires them to think outside of the web arch. and TDD box. Anyone can be a code monkey; good developers are problem solvers.
Jan
8
awarded  Commentator
Jan
8
comment What is the best way to discern an excellent programmer in a job interview?
I'll disagree with the "puzzles suck" viewpoint. Puzzle questions are useful because they can answer questions like 1) how does this person react to a challenging problem (do they get frustrated/give up easily, do they take a reasonable approach to working things out, etc.), 2) can this person think quickly and creatively and back up their ideas, and 3) approximately how intelligent is this person. Of course, an interview that is only puzzles is a bad idea. But one or two such questions can be useful. Remember that you want programmers who are problem solvers, not monkeys on typewriters.
May
18
awarded  Yearling