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Jul
1
comment What's the difference between simulation and emulation
Note that it depends on what is being simulated/emulated. For example, something that emulates a PC compatible computer may be far less accurate and a lot less realistic than something that simulates the digital circuitry of a PC compatible computer. In this case, the simulator may behave "exactly like" a real PC while the emulator doesn't (because the simulator is simulating something at a much lower level).
Jun
20
awarded  Quorum
Jun
18
answered Relation between Kernel & BIOS routines
May
31
answered Are hex dump and binary-to-text encoding related or different things?
May
26
comment What makes functional programming languages declarative as opposed to Imperative?
@ALXGTV: Functional programming is a sub-set of imperative programming (not a super-set). Essentially, you take imperative programming and remove the ability to modify state. Of course in practice this makes it unusable for any practical purpose; so you're forced to re-introduce the ability to modify state in a different form (e.g. monads); which means that in practice it ends up being equivalent to imperative programming (just with different syntax) and neither a sub-set nor super-set.
May
24
revised How do hybrid interpreter-JIT compilers work?
added 219 characters in body
May
24
answered How do hybrid interpreter-JIT compilers work?
May
23
awarded  Revival
May
23
revised What is the explication for the difference execution time for the same instruction?
added 532 characters in body
May
23
answered What is the explication for the difference execution time for the same instruction?
May
21
awarded  Yearling
May
13
comment What are the benefits of a device driver when I can access the I/O registers directly?
@smeeb: It'd be more correct to say that the device driver provides an abstraction. Basically, on one side you have the hardware's (device specific) interface, in the middle is the driver that provides the abstraction, and on the other side is the software that uses the abstraction (file systems, networking stack, whatever).
May
11
comment Client wants source code, but it contains a lot of shared code I reuse with other projects
Would it be possible to strip out everything in the library that their application doesn't use, and only sell/give them the minimum they actually need?
Apr
29
comment List comparing techniques for faster performance
@cap7: If one of the lists can contain duplicates (e.g. 6 copies of "Fred" in the long list) then it won't matter. If both lists can contain duplicates (e.g. 6 copies of "Fred" on the long list and 3 copies of "Fred" on the short list) then you'll get duplicated matches. To avoid that the most efficient way is to remove duplicates while sorting (sorting also has a "compare if earlier, equal or later" step where you can discard or mark the entry as "to be skipped later" if equal).
Apr
28
answered List comparing techniques for faster performance
Apr
26
comment Why was the Itanium processor difficult to write a compiler for?
Erm. 80x86 has supported 36-bit physical addressing (or a limit of "not quite 64 GiB of RAM") since the introduction of PAE and PSE36 in about 1995. The problem was very few versions of Windows supported PAE due to device driver incompatibilities (but some did).
Apr
25
comment Polling more recent / active items more frequently
For each post have a list of "things" (people/members?) to notify if/when the post changes; and for each "thing" have a list of posts that have changed. Whenever a post changes, add the notifications to each "thing's" list. Whenever you need to send anything to a "thing", append its list of posts that changed to whatever you're already sending (and set the list to empty). No polling, no delays, no searching through thousands of posts to see what changed, no/minimal extra packets across the network.
Apr
21
comment How to spread awareness for generic programming among team members?
Some people are wise. When they want a cup of coffee they'll make a cup of coffee. Some people are "knowledgeable". When they want a cup of coffee they'll start building a fantastic machine capable of heating, cooling, brewing, carbonating and mixing any kind of beverage; but die of thirst before it's finished.
Apr
11
comment Is directly using Make considered obsolete?
@Darkslash: Once you start considering (hypothetical) alternatives it's like opening floodgates - you end up questioning everything (and end up with ideas like separation of semantics and syntax, and redesigning IDEs and tools and delivery as a set rather than individual pieces of the larger puzzle). More practical is to realise that tools like cmake only treat symptoms and can't cure the root cause/s; which makes it easier to accept the fact that you've got no choice other than to use tools that will probably never be close to "ideal".
Apr
11
answered Is directly using Make considered obsolete?