4,516 reputation
11733
bio website langnostic.inaimathi.ca
location Toronto, Canada
age 29
visits member for 4 years
seen 2 days ago

Common Lisp/Scheme/Haskell/Elisp/JavaScript hacker with a degree in Graphic Design, an eye for layout and a hungry, hungry mind.


Apr
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
6
awarded  Excavator
Feb
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
17
revised Is MySQL viable for small-medium business applications
added 153 characters in body
Feb
17
comment Is MySQL viable for small-medium business applications
Sorry, that should have read "...you never distribute anything...". Also, refer to section 13 of the AGPL for relevant bits there.
Feb
17
comment Is MySQL viable for small-medium business applications
IANAL, but based on what you describe, you're ok. The GPL only bites if you try to distribute GPLed code without also providing a "the corresponding source", or directions for how to freely obtain it. Sections 4 and 6 of the license are relevant to you. If by "hosted", you mean "software as a service", you never distribute source code, so you're fine unless you use a component licensed under the AGPL (in which case, you need to post the source for your server for all your users in order to comply).
Feb
17
revised Is MySQL viable for small-medium business applications
deleted 1 characters in body
Feb
17
answered Is MySQL viable for small-medium business applications
Feb
12
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
21
comment Stack-instructions machines
@Donal - That is a true statement.
Jan
20
comment Stack-instructions machines
@Peter - Yeah... It's interesting, but a much lower level of abstraction than I'm used to dealing with for typesetting.
Jan
20
revised Stack-instructions machines
added implementation and documentation links
Jan
20
revised Stack-instructions machines
added implementation and documentation links
Jan
20
answered Stack-instructions machines
Nov
27
comment Why should we use low level languages if a high level one like python can do almost everything?
You shouldn't randomly rewrite code that you plan to make no further changes to (that's a waste of effort no matter what you're rewriting to) but I'm not sure how wide the gulf is between "understanding a million lines of C for the purposes of adding features/making significant changes" and "understanding a million lines of C for the purposes of rewriting it in something else". Having that much code that your team doesn't understand already sounds like quite the liability to me.
Nov
25
comment Why should we use low level languages if a high level one like python can do almost everything?
@marcof - As an illustrative example, I refer you to the first ~35 seconds of this video. Joking aside, I don't know if you could compress 1 000 000 lines of idiomatic C down to 5k lines of idiomatic python, but my point was that the choice is not as simple as if plan.scan /rewrit(e|ing)/ false end; there is a benefit conferred by rewriting in a more expressive, less verbose language with the obvious performance cost. If you can afford it, it might be a good idea.
Oct
11
comment Why should we use low level languages if a high level one like python can do almost everything?
@Dark Templar - Because the components of a purely functional program have no dependency on external state and have no assumptions about what order they will run in. This makes it easier (though not easy) to reason about how to efficiently break such a program up across different processes. Have a Haskell-related link in which Simon Peyton Jones explains his approach in-depth.
Oct
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
19
awarded  Yearling
Sep
2
comment Difference between free and open software?
@Jonathan - Had you adhered to the terms of the GPL, you could have enacted those innovations. What it would have entailed is merely not restricting your users. I think what you meant to say is "We wanted to innovate on top of GPL code and then refuse (or limit) access to it to anyone outside our company/group/what-have-you". Preventing that kind of free-riding is the precise purpose of the GPL. No, it does not infect source code; you are perfectly free to do without it. If you want the benefit of building on it, you must not reduce access to works derived from it. That's all.