391 reputation
26
bio website orcamediauk.co.uk
location United Kingdom
age 46
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Jun 29 '11 at 12:42
Been programming on and off since the age of 11. Written in BASIC, z80a, 6502, 68000, x86, PASCAL, Forth, C, C++, Perl, Javascript and C#. Written for ASICs through to Windows apps so have been around the block a bit. Mainly written for Educational publishing in recent years, getting heavily into ASP.NET at the moment and looking at MVC for my next apps. When not coding, normally found doing my day job of programme management, astride my horse or asleep. Happily married with many furry children (2 horses, 1 dog, 2 guinea pigs, and a fish) and living in sunny Hampshire. Flair code: liRP3bayk49bxOQ9

Sep
20
awarded  Yearling
May
25
awarded  Good Answer
May
25
awarded  Mortarboard
May
25
awarded  Nice Answer
May
25
comment How to apologize when you have broken the nightly build
If the build never broke I'd begin to suspect a broken build process ;)
May
25
answered How to apologize when you have broken the nightly build
May
25
answered Is it worth making Visual Assembly?
Mar
24
comment Resources or advice useful coming to C# from python 2.7.1
Sorry, I wasn't clear. I meant there would be articles/guides everywhere on transitioning from Python to C# if it was a reasonable path where highlighting the differences would be easier than a 'clean slate' approach. I came to C# from C/C++ and even years later I still find things about C# that are elegant and faster than the approaches I brought with me from my visually similar known languages. In a way I wish I'd come to it without any familiarity so that I learned how to write C# and not C/C++ in C#.
Mar
24
awarded  Commentator
Mar
24
comment Resources or advice useful coming to C# from python 2.7.1
Agreed, basic constructs will be basic constructs in every language. I'm not a python person so can't comment on the similarities or differences, it just strikes me that if there were similarities that would allow a simple transition then it would be everywhere.
Mar
24
comment OS knowledge when learning a computer programming language
Surely a stack is a programming construct, although it's supported by specific instructions in most processors it's there to support programming methods and isn't a function of the computer as such. You could get by without a stack. Just a thought.
Mar
24
answered Resources or advice useful coming to C# from python 2.7.1
Mar
24
answered OS knowledge when learning a computer programming language
Mar
24
answered Aggregation vs Composition
Mar
24
comment free as in free beer
Linux is free, Redhat's expertise in service and support of Linux isn't free. That is how they make their money. Like hardware, the profit margin on software is being squeezed so companies look to the services that surround the software to make a profit; but the software remains free. For software, business rarely looks at product cost, they are interested in the TCO (Total Cost of Ownership) which includes product cost, support costs, maintenance, etc, etc. I've yet to meet a business man who doesn't like truly free (but only as a purchaser) ;)
Mar
24
answered free as in free beer
Jan
21
comment Is it fair to use shortened url to mention and give links of live projects in my resume?
I've never encountered that kind of blocking, blocking facebook and twitter, yes, but not bit.ly, etc. That said, may be the approach you take is to create an online portfolio of your web work on a relatively straight forward and short URL which has the descriptions and links to the various projects you've worked on. You could then just include the link to that on your Resume.
Jan
21
answered Is it fair to use shortened url to mention and give links of live projects in my resume?
Jan
21
comment Programming language usage at Google
If one language is enough, why is there Python, C++ or Java at all? We could all just use the Assembly language for the processor our systems are running.
Oct
14
comment Is a MSDN subsciption worthwhile for personal use?
I seem to remember Microsoft extending their licenses for the Office products in that way but didn't realise they had done it for other products.