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Oct
2
answered What is the best way to go about testing that we handle failures appropriately?
Sep
29
comment Programming vs Planning
I should have said industry-competitive raises rather than cost of living raises. I edited my answer to say just that. Those industry-competitive raises are pretty sweet for young adults, typically much better than inflation. Cost of living raises are for old fogies. There's a problem when someone gets raises higher than inflation but that person's skills remain that of a fresh out.
Sep
29
revised Programming vs Planning
Cost of living raises is what old fogies get. Young uns typically get significantly better than cost of living.
Sep
28
comment Programming vs Planning
"The dirty little secret is no one is very good at long term planning and estimation." Ain't that the truth! +1 just for that. Even with a good history, there are lots of numbers that need to be plucked from the clear blue sky because the next project is never an exact copy of any previous project. If it was, we'd be able to reuse all of the code as-is and be done with it ASAP. There's always something new, and past performance is not always a good indicator of how the effort needed for that new stuff.
Sep
28
answered Programming vs Planning
Sep
27
comment Does comparison operand order affect speed?
That's a new twist to foist this silly style. It isn't faster, and yes, it does do more harm than good.
Sep
25
comment Differential and integral calculus for programmer
+1, even with the Numerical Recipes reference. It's kind of the flip side of the problem. It's quite bad from a computer science perspective (not to mention that it's just bad from a math perspective).
Sep
25
comment Differential and integral calculus for programmer
Finance, science, engineering, medicine. There is a huge demand for people who understand math and can program. This line of thinking is exactly why my employer throws resumes of those with a computer science degree in the trash. We who interview and hire don't even get a chance to see those resumes. Even if the job is largely programming, we'd much rather hire a scientist or engineer who has learned to program (badly!) in an ad hoc manner over of the typical comp sci major who exudes the attitude displayed in this question.
Sep
25
answered Spending a good fortune on a certificate holding Scrum Master or a Veteran XP coach?
Sep
25
comment Spending a good fortune on a certificate holding Scrum Master or a Veteran XP coach?
+1, +∞ if I could. There is no silver bullet, but there are always snake oil salescritters trying to sell silver bullets. (I much prefer salescritters over salesmen, for two reasons. The term "salesmen" is sexist, but more importantly it implies that those critters are human.)
Sep
24
awarded  Good Answer
Sep
23
comment Is a coding standard even needed any more?
@GlenPeterson - Indentation/formatting is in my list, or just before my list: "IMO, a coding standard should specify a reasonable suite of acceptable indentation styles, but leave the specifics to the authors of a package." And yes, there are exceptions to the "no tabs" rule. Makefiles, for instance.
Sep
22
answered Improving without mentor
Sep
22
answered Should coding standards be enforced by the continuous integration server?
Sep
22
comment Is a coding standard even needed any more?
@ratchetfreak and Matthew Scharley: I'm not a fan of automated formatting tools. They just don't work if you allow multiple styles, and enforcing a single style is one of those small things a standard should avoid. (Rule number zero: Don't sweat the small stuff.) You don't have reformatting changes if the rule is that all code in a "module", whatever that is, must be formatted consistently, and per the style selected the principal author of the module. Rewriting someone else's code just because you don't like their style is verboten.
Sep
22
revised Is a coding standard even needed any more?
added 1511 characters in body
Sep
22
comment Is a coding standard even needed any more?
Note that the "no tabs" rule (something I avoided in my list because opinions do vary) doesn't mean you can't use tabs when you are typing your code. A decent editor can convert the tabs the programmer types in to whitespace. If your editor can't do that, maybe think of switching to a better editor.
Sep
22
comment Is a coding standard even needed any more?
An easy way to deal with tabs vs. spaces is to disallow tabs in the coding standard. An easy way to enforce this is to have a checkin hook that either rejects the checkin or that converts tabs used as whitespace to spaces. Automatically verifying some of the coding standards such as during a nightly build or at checkin (preferable due to the near-instant feedback) is a very nice-to-have feature. What if the checkin is allowed (or forced), and conversion makes a mess? There's an easy answer to that, too: Code review. An ugly POS shouldn't pass muster; it shouldn't even be reviewed.
Sep
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
22
answered Is a coding standard even needed any more?