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visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Jul 9 at 19:22

I have over 30 years of experience with C and C++, and experience with various other lesser languages.

I highly recommend http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp as an online C++11 Standard Library reference.

Also, I have redefined the acronym STL to mean STandard Library. It is now safe to use again.

Quotes

Oli Charlesworth: Both these questions would be answered in the first few chapters of any decent introductory book on C++.

jeremyskateboard: well i dont have a book


The first rule of C/C++ is that there is no such thing as "C/C++". – Kerrek SB


Best answers (of mine):

Favourite questions:


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jun
1
awarded  Yearling
Jun
1
awarded  Yearling
Mar
14
comment Giving variables default values vs. treating accessing an undefined variable as an error
This also reminds me that in certain languages like Lisp and Python, unless a parameter is explicitly given a default value, if you call a function with the wrong number of arguments it will error, whereas with languages like Lua and Ruby it does not. I guess this makes sense when your languages (like Lisp and Python) has more powerful ways of passing arguments. So basically the main consideration is misspelling?
Mar
13
revised Giving variables default values vs. treating accessing an undefined variable as an error
added 88 characters in body
Mar
13
asked Giving variables default values vs. treating accessing an undefined variable as an error
Sep
29
awarded  Guru
Sep
13
comment Strictness in programming methods among Stack Overflow users
@Shahbaz ha, too late :(
Sep
13
comment Teaching C++ to first time high school students: Where to draw the line?
@Jim pointers an arrays are as much a part of C++ as the standard library. And how can you imply that pointers aren't fun :) I think you may underestimate the intelligence of high school students, and most of the time freshman college cs students are just as rank of beginners as the hs students are.
Sep
12
awarded  Mortarboard
Sep
12
comment Teaching C++ to first time high school students: Where to draw the line?
@DeadMG I disagree in that all buildings in C++ require the same foundation, a part of which is things like arrays and pointers. Where our opinions diverge is at the point where we decide what the foundation consists of I guess. To each his own.
Sep
12
comment Teaching C++ to first time high school students: Where to draw the line?
@DeadMG but we're teaching people to be house builders. Classes like vector are not basic compared to pointers because they have to use pointers to work. A roof, while basic, is not more basic than the walls. And yeah, like I said, I knew I'd get a lot of downvotes (8 so far) because everyone likes the easy path, even in teaching :) It's easier to say "use this, don't worry about how it works."
Sep
12
comment Teaching C++ to first time high school students: Where to draw the line?
@sbi no need to be violent :)
Sep
12
comment Teaching C++ to first time high school students: Where to draw the line?
@sbi "advanced", "easy", and "basic" are all completely different. Basic things are "core principles." You start with the basic and move to the advanced, no matter what is easy. Addition is basic, solving integrals is not. Classes are advanced, pointers are basic and a core utility of C++. Which is easier? It doesn't matter, you start with pointers first. How easy it is depends on the person.
Sep
12
comment Teaching C++ to first time high school students: Where to draw the line?
@sbi why on earth do you want to take the "easiest-first" route to anything? You don't need to be a mechanic to drive a car. But if you want to be a good mechanic, you need to be able to take apart a car and put it back together.
Sep
12
comment Strictness in programming methods among Stack Overflow users
@Shahbaz it was playing on what In silico said: "they're more like guidelines than anything else." It sounds like what Captain Barbosa said in Pirates of the Caribbean about the pirate code. Then he said "Ye must be a pirate for the pirate's code to apply, and you're not." It was a joke, I wasn't saying you're not a programmer.
Sep
12
comment Strictness in programming methods among Stack Overflow users
+1. Secondly, you have to be a programmer for the programmer's code to apply, and you're not.
Sep
12
comment Strictness in programming methods among Stack Overflow users
When you start answering questions, your answer has to be 100% correct. If it won't work on a computer that doesn't use ASCII, that needs to be mentioned. As for getting criticised for using the C part of C++, I do it and just ignore everyone when they start throwing a fit because I didn't use a vector or something.
Sep
12
awarded  Good Answer
Sep
12
awarded  Nice Answer