1,123 reputation
2821
bio website beatgammit.com
location Provo, UT
age 25
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Mar 24 at 16:39

I am studying Computer Science at Brigham Young University. I been interested in computers and computer programming since I was a teenager.


Jul
27
comment What are functional languages most used for?
I use aura, but I'm not sure that's a typical example.
Jul
27
comment Information protection when registering on web sites
Why would you make those assumptions? The Internet is not a friendly place.
Jul
20
comment Not sure how to study Web programming
+1 My firsh programming job was in high-school. My boss wanted me to keep track of hours, so I wrote a simple PHP page to keep track of them. I slowly iterated on it while working there, and by the time I left for college I could edit past logs, archive old months, and even generate reports. It doesn't have to be fancy, just enough to keep you interested.
Jul
20
comment is there a programming language designed to express data combinations?
The term you're looking for is globbing
Jul
16
comment Provide both RESTful interfaces and Java ones?
What do you mean by "Java ones"? Are you talking about using serialization? Or are you going to provide your server code as a library that they can then access directly?
Jul
5
comment Is there a tool or process to help FOSS authors agree on a license?
I tend to use wikipedia. Probably not exactly what you're looking for though.
May
16
comment Solving the last mile problem in software engineering
I generally do a test deploy to a VM, but I'm not if that's the answer you're looking for.
May
14
comment Languages with graph data structures and algorithms in standard library
I don't remember the last time I've wanted a graph library. Typically, if the graph is pretty dense, I use a matrix, but if it's sparse, I use a map. These are two very different data structures, so it would be hard to make a unified solution that is also performant, which is what a standard lib would need. Since it's so dependent on use-case, I'd have to point to @gnat's link.
May
14
comment Single codebase for client and server with Node.js
@Den - True, but at least it's pretty well-defined, as opposed to languages like C++ where everybody uses a vastly different subset. Languages like Java just don't give enough flexibility, so I prefer Javascript for that. As mentioned, I've since left Node.js, but I could consider returning if given the right problem to solve.
May
14
comment Single codebase for client and server with Node.js
@funkybro - Just going out on a limb and guessing you're my downvote. This question is highly subjective, so it's impossible to give an non-subjective answer. There are debugging tools (node-inspector being the most popular). It's inherently difficult to debug async programs, but that's not specific to JS, it's true of any concurrent language (Erlang, Go, threaded C/C++/Java, etc.). Care to elaborate?
May
14
comment Use of file processing system like NTFS for file system of Operating System
What exactly are the advantages of an RDBMS in this context? RDBMSs work well in a relational environment. Is a filesystem relational?
May
14
comment Why not use a RTOS with microkernel architecture for highly concurrent web servers?
Why do you want an RTOS? Also, hard or soft real-time? A hard RTOS would be very hard for a micro-kernel because of its async nature.
May
4
comment Why are many programmers moving their code to github?
With Google code, I can star issues, which lets the devs know which issues are important to the community and helps me keep track of progress. Github only seems to have anonymous following, which can lead to comment spam (+1, me too, etc). This is significant for popular projects with limited resources.
May
4
comment Why are many programmers moving their code to github?
It's also fantastic for finding the most maintained branch. I recently had to find which fork of a certain repository was actually maintained (non-trivial because the more up-to-date forks hadn't yet floated to the top of a google search).
Apr
7
comment Term for accidental features
@smp7d I'd say the same thing, but with a wink.
Apr
7
comment Term for accidental features
@MasonWheeler Citing a feature as "accidental" shows you don't have good quality control. An "undocumented feature", on the other hand, sounds planned, even if it was an accident. I write code for a lot of government clients, and they don't like surprises.
Apr
7
comment Term for accidental features
I call them "undocumented features", though I often use it sarcastically to refer to a bug. Not sure if that's standard though.
Apr
3
comment Map of functions vs switch statement
@pdr - Right. My inclination was a map of commands to functions, but I'm a relatively junior programmer in a CS design course. My professor likes lots of classes, so there's at least 2 legitimate solutions. I wanted to know the community's favorite.
Apr
3
comment Map of functions vs switch statement
The commands are unique strings. I can map these to integers if needed.
Mar
27
comment Why do some big projects, like Git and Debian, only use a mailing list and not an issue tracker?
@RossPatterson - He said Linux was older than the web, not Git. I don't think your comment justifies a down vote, since you basically repeated what he said.