3,037 reputation
1025
bio website sites.google.com/site/…
location CT, USA
age 48
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen 4 hours ago

What do I look for in a post? Clarity and Contribution.

NO vote: If the post is clear, but makes no contribution OR if the post is unclear, but makes a contribution (though I will try to improve the clarity either by comments or direct edit).

UP vote: If the post is clear and makes a contribution.

DOWN vote: If the post is unclear and makes no contribution (though I will try to see if I've missed something by commenting).


Mar
19
comment Machine Learning Algorithm for Heating/Lighting Optimization
Most examples I've seen don't need to delve into any of the algorithms. Have a look at fuzzy controllers. They don't tend to need much "learning" (unless you count calibration as learning), but they do give a way of relating qualitative statements about comfort to what you should do with the heating / cooling system.
Mar
19
comment How valuable for my career is working on an extremely primitive platform?
Is there a pin-compatible chip that has more RAM / ROM ? Check out its cost. If you can cram more functionality into a chip with more memory by using a better development methodology that might spark your bosses' interest.
Mar
19
comment Machine Learning Algorithm for Heating/Lighting Optimization
Why do you think you need machine learning to solve this problem? It's not clear what your problem is that you are trying to learn about. What sort of HVAC equipment are you using to control the temperature / humidity / air flow ?
Mar
18
comment Unit Testing in a “no setter” world
@pdr: Either that, or your design is too brittle! :-)
Mar
18
comment Unit Testing in a “no setter” world
I've yet to see a unit test which could only fail for a single possible reason. Also, you can put the "state manipulation" parts of the test into a setup() method --- not the test itself.
Mar
18
comment Unit Testing in a “no setter” world
Understood. Your example did not mention many more properties, and the number in the example is "on the cusp" of having this as a valid approach. It seems that this is telling you something about your design: you can't put your object into any valid state on instantiation. That means you need to put it into a valid initial state, and them manipulate it into the right state for test. That implies Lie Ryan's answer is the way to go.
Mar
18
comment Unit Testing in a “no setter” world
No -1 from me, but including test code in production is generally a Bad Thing(TM).
Mar
18
answered Unit Testing in a “no setter” world
Mar
13
comment System requirement specification vs functional one - separate docs?
@Downvoter: Feedback to improve appreciated!
Feb
25
awarded  Constituent
Feb
19
comment Is is acceptable to create mediocre code now in preparation for new language features?
YAGNI -- You Ain't Gonna Need It.
Feb
18
awarded  Caucus
Feb
16
comment Software Engineer and IT Professionals
This guy had the title "Minister of Algorithms". No typo, either. :-)
Feb
15
revised Is HTML5 usable for syncing data between devices?
added 118 characters in body
Feb
15
answered Is HTML5 usable for syncing data between devices?
Feb
15
answered organising classes / folder structure for TDD-based development
Feb
11
comment System requirement specification vs functional one - separate docs?
@user970696: I always found the name "non-functional specification" strange: is a "non-functional specification" a broken specification? That's why I tend to avoid the term "functional spec" and go for "requirements" (if it's WHAT the system has to do) or "design" (if it's HOW the system has to do it).
Feb
11
revised System requirement specification vs functional one - separate docs?
Responding to comment.
Feb
11
answered System requirement specification vs functional one - separate docs?
Feb
10
comment Good platform to teach Programming 101?
+1 For scratch: My nephews have really taken to it.