594 reputation
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location Cologne, Germany
age 28
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Apr 10 at 14:57

Sep
19
awarded  Yearling
May
5
awarded  Student
May
5
comment Best way to reliably recognize open source licenses?
@MarkJ: The typical scenario is finding something on GitHub or BitBucket with a LICENSE text or license header comment that doesn't name the license and only contains its text. Copying that text and running a diff tool against a set of references (which would imply I need to have a local copy of all major licenses) seems impractical and overkill. This being such a common issue, I wouldn't expect every programmer to have a reference copy of every license let alone have all of them memorized. Widespread obliviousness of the law notwithstanding.
May
5
comment Best way to reliably recognize open source licenses?
So you're saying rote memorization (of the general layout at least) is currently the only way to recognize them? That's what I feared. I'm working with Django apps and jQuery plugins in this case, too, btw. But I've seen licenses in the wild that seem very similar to MIT, BSD, etc, but contain minor modifications (say, the JSON license, which is not compatible with the GPL).
May
5
comment Best way to reliably recognize open source licenses?
@JoeyAdams: No. I'm not asking how to decide. I'm asking how to recognize them when the author just dumped one in a LICENSE file and didn't specify the name (i.e. what mgibsonbr said). In some cases the license isn't in the code files themselves, so grep is not the answer.
May
5
asked Best way to reliably recognize open source licenses?
Sep
20
awarded  Yearling
Aug
3
answered How do you define elegant code?
Jun
21
comment What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
@acidzombie24 That was really just a random example for the kind of job that would require some solid maths/compsci knowledge. A more realistic one would be working as a performance specialist at Google, but you get the idea. However, the vast majority of programming jobs are more about knowing the right frameworks and libraries and being able to write clean glue code. Heck, the majority of such jobs don't even require any serious optimization. As for your jab: I've met quite a few know-nothings with degrees, so I can back that one up.
Jun
17
comment What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
@Pavel, Oh, I absolutely agree that given two programmers with the same CV, the one with a degree is probably the better one. But the actual benefit for a university education is only apparent in a handful of situations. Most of it can be learned without spending three years writing research papers. The obvious exceptions to this are things like insurance software or physical simulations, although those also require some decent domain knowledge in addition.
May
17
awarded  Good Answer
Mar
24
awarded  Necromancer
Oct
25
answered Biggest mistake you've ever made
Oct
19
awarded  Suffrage
Oct
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
21
comment What techniques do you use when interviewing developers?
I agree with Evan. In practice it's often sufficient to be aware of the performance of different sorting/search algorithms and basic data structures. Knowing how to implement them is neat, but ultimately useless. Also, in most programming jobs it's more important to know how to pick the right framework/library for the task than how to implement QuickSort in under three lines.
Sep
21
comment How to prevent deep indentations?
This also works for complex if-conditions. Taken to the extreme, you'll end up with executable pseudocode.
Sep
19
comment What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
Let's rephrase that as "That comments are inherently useful", because that is obviously blatantly wrong. Comments can even be misleading or disruptive. Ideally code should be self-explanatory. Comments should only be used to add non-obvious details or explain complex code that can't be refactored into a more readable version (e.g. because doing so would be seriously inefficient or impossible).
Sep
19
comment What's the most absurd myth about programming issues?
@orokusaki: True, but with Python et al. you'll often find that "new" versions are supported alongside "old" ones (e.g. Python 2 and 3, PHP 4 and 5) and often the underlying code will be forward-compatible (e.g. all of Python 2.x to 2.7). Many dynamic languages make sure only to break compatibility in major releases and are quite careful not to do so too frequently.
Sep
19
awarded  Commentator