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bio website trojansax.blogspot.com
location Los Angeles, CA
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen yesterday

Nov
17
comment In what language could I track reference counting in the simplest and safest way? (Or track existing reference counting?)
Hm, the Chrome devtools can produce a heap snapshot. That might be close to what you want.
Nov
6
comment Shouldn't we count characters of code and comments instead of lines of code and comments?
There are lots of bad reasons to count lines of code, but lots of good reasons too. If you're porting some old code from one language to another, the more LOC in the old code, the longer it will probably take. If you're hunting for a bug, the more code you have to look through to find it, the harder it might be. Etc. It wasn't asked super eloquently but I think it's a highly constructive question.
Oct
16
awarded  Good Answer
Sep
19
awarded  Yearling
Jul
20
comment is there a programming language designed to express data combinations?
Haskell has a way to express ranges, pretty similar to the Bash syntax from choroba's answer.
Jul
14
comment How to justify migration from Java 6 to Java 7?
I think the idea is that less boilerplate means it's easier to get right.
Jun
22
answered Git tracks _lines_ of code. Is there something that track _words_?
Jun
22
answered Should we be looking out for lying code?
Feb
19
awarded  Caucus
Feb
13
comment Java Generics - how to strike a balance between expressiveness and simplicity
Guava is code.google.com/p/guava-libraries
Jan
30
comment Why did memory-managed languages like Java, Javascript, and C# retain the `new` keyword?
It's not constructive to ask why a language is designed the way it is, particularly if that design asks us to type four extra characters for no obvious benefit? What am I missing?
Jan
10
awarded  Civic Duty
Dec
15
comment Code Smell: Inheritance Abuse
Just for the record, Haskell is 10 years older than C# :)
Dec
11
comment OO Design, how to model Tonal Harmony?
It seems to me that it might be helpful to think about what you want to do with these note/chord/scale classes. Are you going to produce sheet music? Midi files? Do transformations on scores (transposition, doubling all the note lengths, adding trills to all whole notes above a certain note, etc.)? Once you have a possible class structure, think about how you would accomplish those tasks. If it seems awkward, maybe you want a different class structure.
Nov
29
revised Why does Java allow to implement different interfaces, each containing a method with the same signature?
make code look code-ey
Nov
29
comment Why does Java allow to implement different interfaces, each containing a method with the same signature?
If you highlight your code and click the {} button, then the site will format it to look like code.
Nov
29
suggested suggested edit on Why does Java allow to implement different interfaces, each containing a method with the same signature?
Nov
29
comment Why does Java allow to implement different interfaces, each containing a method with the same signature?
"If you consider it a design issue where one interface has one contract for that method and the other interface has other contract then not allowing it would not solve the issue." Why not? It would force you to rename one of the interface methods. If the interfaces are coming from third-party code, that might involving asking that third party to change it, but it would effectively solve the problem, wouldn't it?
Nov
29
comment Did a bunch of wrong work, should I keep it?
-1 this just makes the history harder to follow. If you're doing a git bisect, for example, you could end up with a range of commits which includes this code which was written and then deleted. Why not put it in a separate branch? Give the branch a name starting with 'obsolete_' if you want, but don't pollute the history of your main development branch with code you don't intend to use. I would vote for the OP's option #2.
Nov
6
comment Why do browsers leak memory?
By "you can easily have memory leaks even in those languages that do have [garbage collection]" I didn't mean that the language itself would be leaky (though that is possible). I meant, as askhilless said, that it's possible to write programs in Java which leak memory.