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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 7 votes cast
Feb
6
awarded  Scholar
Feb
6
accepted What is the technical term for anything that can obtain a reference?
Feb
6
revised What is the technical term for anything that can obtain a reference?
edited title
Feb
6
comment What is the technical term for anything that can obtain a reference?
@DocBrown There's only no good answer if there is no answer at all. If there is an answer, however, then there is indeed a good answer (or at least a best answer). You never know until you ask. Oh well, though. If the close-voters end up shutting this question down, at lease I now have a good answer that I can mark so that this question will live on forever for eternity even if it's in a closed state.
Feb
6
comment What is the technical term for anything that can obtain a reference?
Also, I wonder who would downvote this question when my sidebar is chock-full of highly-upvoted questions asking "what is the term for this"
Feb
6
comment What is the technical term for anything that can obtain a reference?
@Bwmat Deleted previous comment as I found other definitions for referent. I like it a lot and will use it in absence of a more official term. It's entirely possible that no such term exists, though, that no one has really ever had a legitimate need to derive an abstract term for these components.
Feb
6
asked What is the technical term for anything that can obtain a reference?
Dec
16
comment Why am I seeing more boolean naming conventions where “is” is used as the first word in the variable (eg, IsUserAdmin vs UserIsAdmin)?
@lux The way I see it, booleans aren't questions to be answered with a yes or no. They're assertions of fact to be evaluated as true or false.
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
22
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
18
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jan
2
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
7
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
20
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
19
awarded  Critic
Jun
19
comment What is the reason for using lowercase for the first word in a local variable (eg, employeeCount, firstName)
@Mr.Mindor Or you can hover your mouse over the item in question and let your IDE tell you what it is. With your method, you're trusting that the previous coder followed an established casing convention. What if they didn't? What if this property you speak of is actually named nuggetCount? What do you do then?
Jun
19
comment What is the reason for using lowercase for the first word in a local variable (eg, employeeCount, firstName)
So it really appears that some older languages have paved the road for coding standards of future languages (like your C/C# example). That is most unfortunate because having to keep track of how to case variables and object members just adds an unnecessary level of complexity that can be done without.
Jun
19
comment What is the reason for using lowercase for the first word in a local variable (eg, employeeCount, firstName)
"If I see a capitalized variable, an educated guess will dictate I'll need to instantiate it to use it." I do not understand. How would seeing a capitalized variable make you think you need to instantiate it before using it? Because it looks like a class name? So you don't know the difference between MyClass MyClass = null and class MyClass { }?
Jun
19
comment What is the reason for using lowercase for the first word in a local variable (eg, employeeCount, firstName)
@JamieF: I'll argue that Employee Employee looks more consistent. This, of course, assumes that the reader understands the underlying framework of the language they're using.
Jun
19
revised What is the reason for using lowercase for the first word in a local variable (eg, employeeCount, firstName)
edited body