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Jul
29
comment Why are there so many CSS properties which are essentially the same?
@ParthianShot Yeah, this comic exists for a reason...
Jul
29
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
29
awarded  Revival
Jul
29
comment Why are there so many CSS properties which are essentially the same?
@JasonGoemaat Part of the point is that the prefixed ones don't have to change, because they're vendor-specific.
Jul
25
comment Why would programmers ignore ISO standards?
@Darkwater23 Actually, an ISO standard uses a weird unicode symbol (this: ) for decimal separator on keyboards, and I thought plain tick marks (') were standardized for digit grouping as well (although I can't find it now)
Jul
25
comment Why would programmers ignore ISO standards?
@djechlin That also specifies a time (which you may not want) and loses time zone (which you might want). There's multiple standards for a reason...
Jul
23
comment Why is polling accepted in web programming?
@slebetman I think you misunderstand. Using multiple IPs with multiple machines sidesteps the limit. (And anyway, StackOverflow does use websockets for updating vote counts (and, I think, notifications) while on a page, so they have sidestepped the limit)
Jul
23
comment Why is polling accepted in web programming?
@DonHatch For web programming? Websockets are relatively new. Polling was the only way for a long time, so most resources online will point at polling with javascript just because there's been more time for it to accumulate. With web programming, polling is also still simpler to implement..
Jul
22
comment Best practices / reasons for String constants in JavaScript
It wouldn't generate any extra requests, the data would be set in the template and used in the javascript. It was the usage of FIRST_NAME in particular that had me wondering - does it not change per user?
Jul
22
comment Best practices / reasons for String constants in JavaScript
FIRST_NAME? That looks like it comes from something server-side and is passed into the javascript. And that combined with you saying you come from Java/C#, I have the feeling you're misreading what these variables are for: Separating the data from the code, so that the .js file can be cached by the browser...
Jul
19
comment Isn't striving for elegance counter-productive?
@proskor No, the comparator function is. The sort function itself is not.
Jul
18
comment How do you deal with being behind on a task?
Working overtime should really only be a last resort for if the feature is actually needed at the end of that sprint (say, due to a bad promise from marketing). Otherwise your velocity is going to get screwed up and create the expectation that this higher number of story points is normal.
Jul
10
comment Is this a good practice or not?
I'm going to start flat out by saying after more than 30 years experience writing software and working in I.T in general, I have NEVER, EVER yet found a good reason for concatenating data coming out of a database. - Here's one: Denormalizing data while importing into an inverted index (such as what Solr uses) for faster querying
Jul
8
comment What is a helper? Is it a design pattern? Is it an algorithm?
There is a subset of these, called "helper functions", that are actually useful and a good pattern. For example, a common set of lines that would otherwise need to be repeated within a function - one example of where they show up is when you need a do..while loop in Python, which the language doesn't support (see the second example here). Another would be an if/elif/.../else structure, but need to repeat a case at the top and bottom. If possible they should be made local to that function, though, and generally not actually called "helper".
Jul
8
comment Random number generation algorithm for human brains?
@eds Um, what? 79 -> 61 -> 15 -> ...
Jul
8
comment Why is software OS specific?
Java runs on a virtual machine, though, which isn't cross-OS. You have to use a different JVM binary for each OS
Jul
7
comment Can a version of Python's shelve module that knows when its entries have been modified be written in any programming language?
So, what, you're suggesting a custom wrapper for every type of object that could be added to shelve? That definitely wouldn't fit into a generic library
Jul
7
comment Can a version of Python's shelve module that knows when its entries have been modified be written in any programming language?
The wrapper will not have all the semantics of the original object, and can't just be blindly inserted where the original object was. It also doesn't recurse - say, if t[0] was an object and it was the thing that was changed
Jul
6
comment Method vs Function vs Procedure
@DjangoReinhardt So a "Stored Procedure" in SQL doesn't return any values? - Depends on how technical you want to get with "return". You typically either read from a cursor to get data, use an "out" parameter (note Frank's answer), or store the result in another table. Not exactly "returning" a value, but a result is retrieved in other ways...
Jul
5
comment why the terms used in Scrum are so strange?
@phaedra In the context of video games, "artifact" is common; its use is along the lines of "not made by the player", which is a perfect parallel for miraculixx's second definition