2,659 reputation
21119
bio website arcsynthesis.org/gltut
location Los Angeles, CA
age 37
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Aug 23 '13 at 12:49

I am a game developer with a fairly broad knowledgebase in the fields of animation and graphics, with a touch of AI.

Projects:


Oct
27
awarded  Student
Oct
26
comment What's so difficult about SVN merges?
@MasonWheeler: Who are you to decide "they're doing it wrong"? You don't use DVCSs, so you have no experience with the DVCS workflow. You have no idea whether it is helpful to programmers or not, as you have no experience with it. So what authority do you have to say that it's "wrong" just because SVN doesn't allow it? It's like saying that classes, virtual functions, and templates are wrong because C doesn't have them.
Oct
26
comment What's so difficult about SVN merges?
@MasonWheeler: No, there isn't. If you are not properly taught how to do something, then you are implicitly trained to not do it. It isn't in your repertoire of idioms you can employ to solve a problem. Therefore, you cannot use it to solve problems. The effect is no different from being told not to merge, because even if you wanted to, you don't know how. The way you offhandedly dismiss a good argument as "the same tired old ground" is evidence of this. You don't think of merging as a tool; you think of it as the exception or something unusual. Something to be questioned rather than used.
Oct
26
comment What's so difficult about SVN merges?
@Mason: How is that not training? You were trained to use SVN in an SVN style. And the SVN style is to not use merging. Thus, you were trained to not use or even consider merging things. That's why it never occurred to you; because you used a system that makes it difficult.
Oct
26
answered What's so difficult about SVN merges?
Oct
26
awarded  Organizer
Oct
26
revised What's so difficult about SVN merges?
edited tags
Oct
26
asked Software licensing and code generation
Jun
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
20
awarded  Yearling
Jun
11
comment How to manage a developer who has poor communication skills
@Jason: 'Maybe the other "average" programmers would become "above-average" if given more programming work, future projects would get done even faster.' And maybe they won't. There's no way to know for certain. So why risk throwing away a valuable asset on the hopes that others will pick up the slack?
Feb
19
comment Why is it so difficult to make C less prone to buffer overflows?
It's still the responsibility of programmers to use the tools they have now to fix these problems. Take a half-day or so and do some grepping through the source code for these things.
Feb
19
comment Why is it so difficult to make C less prone to buffer overflows?
+1 for aiming the problem on the programmers, not the language.
Feb
17
comment Why are several popular programming languages influenced by C?
@DeadMG: But the question is about syntax. You can consider the syntactic similarities to be irrelevant, but the person asking the question wants to know why these irrelevant similarities exist.
Feb
12
awarded  Autobiographer
Feb
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
7
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
6
comment Is C++11 Uniform Initialization a replacement for the old style syntax?
@RobertDailey: "if you did int foo(10), would you not run into the same problem?" No. 10 is an integer literal, and an integer literal can never be a typename. The vexing parse comes from the fact that Bar() could be a typename or a temporary value. That's what creates the ambiguity for the compiler.
Feb
6
comment Is C++11 Uniform Initialization a replacement for the old style syntax?
@RobertDailey: They don't all turn into initializer list statements. as I said, the only reason vector<int> fails is because the type of the initializer list is int, which conflicts with the constructor that takes a single int. So it would only be a problem in those specific circumstances. And, as Xeo points out, you can easily use a simple placeholder object as a way of differentiating between those containers.