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Jan
27
comment Why do game developers prefer Windows?
@FlorianBösch: I never claimed that OpenGL was "dead". As for any "messy ursurption" that may or may not have happened, you should provide some evidence of that. Most of that stuff would be internal to the ARB, so it's not likely we will know what was going on behind closed doors. I only stated what is verifiable information. The ARB was adopted by the Khronos group; that's verifiable; whether this was "ursurption" or not is s different matter.
Jan
18
comment Why do game developers prefer Windows?
@MichaelKjörling: WinG was really before all of this. It was more of a precursor to DirectDraw than D3D.
Jan
15
awarded  Custodian
Jan
15
reviewed Reject Why do game developers prefer Windows?
Dec
29
comment Is C++11 Uniform Initialization a replacement for the old style syntax?
@DanielJames: A fair point. I was thinking more in terms of the CTP, but by the time it hits Beta, the standard library will be updated. And Microsoft doesn't let you target older versions of their standard library so easily. Also, hasn't Apple switched over to libc++?
Dec
29
comment Is C++11 Uniform Initialization a replacement for the old style syntax?
@DanielJames: "which is still a case that portable code needs to deal with" Is it? The Microsoft CTP for VC2012 should not be used for production code; Herb Sutter himself said this. They're not even confident enough in it to call it a beta. You shouldn't be trying to write "portable code" for something that is that deep in production.
Dec
4
awarded  Guru
Nov
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
27
comment Software licensing and code generation
OK, so what is the ownership of the output code in that situation? Does it belong to the OpenGL ARB/Khronos, who publishes the spec files?
Oct
27
comment Software licensing and code generation
That raises an interesting point: I have no idea what the source data is licensed under. The source data itself is just a transform of the publicly available OpenGL specification files. There is no licensing information on these files, so I'm not even sure whether I can license them under the MIT.
Oct
27
awarded  Student
Oct
26
comment What's so difficult about SVN merges?
@MasonWheeler: Who are you to decide "they're doing it wrong"? You don't use DVCSs, so you have no experience with the DVCS workflow. You have no idea whether it is helpful to programmers or not, as you have no experience with it. So what authority do you have to say that it's "wrong" just because SVN doesn't allow it? It's like saying that classes, virtual functions, and templates are wrong because C doesn't have them.
Oct
26
comment What's so difficult about SVN merges?
@MasonWheeler: No, there isn't. If you are not properly taught how to do something, then you are implicitly trained to not do it. It isn't in your repertoire of idioms you can employ to solve a problem. Therefore, you cannot use it to solve problems. The effect is no different from being told not to merge, because even if you wanted to, you don't know how. The way you offhandedly dismiss a good argument as "the same tired old ground" is evidence of this. You don't think of merging as a tool; you think of it as the exception or something unusual. Something to be questioned rather than used.
Oct
26
comment What's so difficult about SVN merges?
@Mason: How is that not training? You were trained to use SVN in an SVN style. And the SVN style is to not use merging. Thus, you were trained to not use or even consider merging things. That's why it never occurred to you; because you used a system that makes it difficult.
Oct
26
answered What's so difficult about SVN merges?
Oct
26
awarded  Organizer
Oct
26
revised What's so difficult about SVN merges?
edited tags
Oct
26
asked Software licensing and code generation
Jun
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
20
awarded  Yearling