2,401 reputation
1819
bio website arcsynthesis.org/gltut
location Los Angeles, CA
age 37
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Aug 23 '13 at 12:49

I am a game developer with a fairly broad knowledgebase in the fields of animation and graphics, with a touch of AI.

Projects:


Aug
5
answered Is information hiding more than a convention?
Aug
3
comment What is the necessity to go for lambda functions and expressions in C++?
It should be noted that if that were a "member function", that means it captured this in some way. Which means that this lambda is now bound to the lifetime of that particular instance of the class. I hope you captured a shared_ptr or something, or else you're looking at trouble down the line. Also, before lambdas, C++ didn't have std::function either (yes, Boost did, but not the standard). It also didn't have std::bind, which you can use to bind member functions and pointers (possibly shared) to function objects.
Jul
25
comment At what point is it good to try to reinvent a standard?
"Browsers are a good example of this." I fail to see how. They are all simply implementations of a standard. Different implementations will have different levels of conformance to that standard. But each browser itself is not a standard. You seem to be missing the difference between a standard and an implementation of that standard.
Jul
24
answered Is UTF-16 fixed-width or variable-width? Why doesn't UTF-8 have byte-order problem?
Jul
10
comment Options other than C for embedded projects? I hate the preprocessor
@michael: the preprocessor does do what it is supposed to do. It builds token lists for the C tokenizer. That's what it is for. Your problem is that it doesn't do things the way you think they should be done, based on a standard you have created yourself. Consider "import." You can't do that with a preprocessor; you need language-level support to make anything like that work in any way different from include. import is not a part of the preprocessor; it's a part of the compiler.
Jul
9
comment Options other than C for embedded projects? I hate the preprocessor
Michael, you're not going to get a lot of sympathy among programmers when you say that C isn't "modern enough." It's not supposed to be modern. C is what it is; you can either accept it for what it is or reject it. And don't think that eLua is going to save you; mobile platforms have rather low power CPUs, and even Lua's performance isn't going to be enough for anything serious with JIT compilation. Of course, there's LuaJIT, which compiles for ARM platforms...
Jul
8
comment How to start with 2d or 3d modeling?
@Steve314: It's better nowadays in the 2.5x series, but it still has idiosyncrasies and still takes some getting used to. Just not as much as before. You can actually use the interface somewhat well without touching the keyboard now.
Jul
3
comment Why do game developers prefer Windows?
@DMan: Cross-platform compatibility is pretty much the only real strength OpenGL has over D3D; in most other repsects, they're close enough to not matter much. Also, most of OpenGL's problems are in the past; the problem is that the past is often why people use something in the present. And that's what my article was showing: how screwups in the past influenced people to pick D3D.
Jul
2
comment Does over-reliance on tools imply that you are lazy?
@Skeith: Does a database user need to care about how to implement a database? Of course not; the database user uses it. They may need to know some of the details, so that they can optimize their databases, but they shouldn't have to be able to implement it in order to be worthy of using it. Also, a programmer may not know what the word "algorithm" means, but that doesn't mean they don't write them. I was developing and implementing algorithms long before I ever heard the term.
Jul
2
comment Mercurial branch or rebase?
+1: I have seen far too many online resources promoting the "clone to branch" methadology. Mercurial has excellent support for in-repo branches; it's a shame that so many choose not to use it.
Jul
2
awarded  Commentator
Jul
1
answered Why does DirectX use a left-handed coordinate system?
Jun
30
comment Why do game developers prefer Windows?
@F.Aquino: My point was that you're misassigning blame. The API used to render has nothing to do with aiming precision. It is the engine code that allows this. For whatever reason, Quake1's engine allowed you to do this, while other engines don't. If game developers wanted to allow players to "camp a pixel" (whatever that means), they would code it into their current engines.
Jun
30
comment Why do game developers prefer Windows?
@wrang-wrang: Thanks for the correction.
Jun
30
revised Why do game developers prefer Windows?
Correction, as noted by comment.
Jun
30
comment OpenGL CPU vs. GPU
It's because geometry shaders have terrible tessellation performance. You should never use them to tessellate anything; at least, not on hardware that doesn't also have tessellation shaders. Hardware with tessellation shaders is designed to magnify geometry, so it has memory buffers and such that make this process smooth. Hardware before then does not have these features, so while a geometry shader theoretically can do a 1:400 vertex magnification, you never should.
Jun
29
revised Why do game developers prefer Windows?
Pointing out that Microsoft may have been sabotaging the ARB.
Jun
29
comment Why do game developers prefer Windows?
@Clinton: I mentioned that Microsoft was once on the ARB. But they didn't exactly "leave to work on DirectX"; they were part of the ARB until around the time OpenGL 2.0 came out. By then, D3D was approaching version 9. Indeed, I wouldn't be surprised if they were part of the reason why the ARB stayed away from shaders for so long. Though I think I'll add a paragraph explaining that speculation.
Jun
29
comment Why do game developers prefer Windows?
@greyfade: GL 4 doesn't appeal to developers anymore than GL 3 did. I stopped where I did because nothing really changed. Yes, GL 4 exposes D3D 11 features, but you could just use D3D 11 to get those. Nothing has changed that has helped or hurt OpenGL's market position. Think of GL 4 as the ARB treading water.
Jun
29
awarded  Great Answer