934 reputation
47
bio website jimrush.net
location Phoenix, AZ
age 46
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Jul 10 at 2:11

I bought my first computer, a TI 99/4A at the age of 14. From that moment on, I knew I wanted to write software.

Many computers, operating systems, and programming languages later, I still enjoy writing software. In those days, the code might have been to play a tune, a lunar lander clone or even a little hardware integration to turn on and off lights. Today, I design and write software for enterprise customers. But, there is still a little time for those small utility applications that help out around the house.


Feb
6
answered What is the motivation that makes you to stick with current job?
Feb
4
answered Can you be a manager and a programmer at the same time?
Jan
30
comment Are performance and salary reviews *really* harmful?
I agree with the answer, because it tends to be right in practice. A good manager should work hard to overcome the limits of the common system and be focused on building strong individuals and teams. Way too much easily found backing material out there to try and simplify here. Judge your manager and company on how they handle this problem and take action if necessary.
Jan
30
comment How much Code Coverage is “enough”?
I like the number (70%). As my teams get higher, I tend to start finding tests for coverage than for value. On the WPF comment, we are just in the beginning days. Meaning, we aren't building/structuring WPF code to be easily testable. Mock models help. When designing code, design it to be testable. And, yes, at this point there are limited examples so you'll have think about it. No different than where most developers were as TDD was introduced to them for the first time just less industry experience.
Jan
30
comment TDD with limited resources
One addition: Initially, look for highest value tests. Tests that let you know, early, you've broken your code base. These tend to be high, sweeping tests that don't tell you what you broke, but that you broke it. You'll very quickly see the value of a CI, with testing, environment. Use tests to debug breakage. With a system in place, the costs of adding new tests starts getting easier/cheaper and you can focus on more tests that do a better job of proving that it works and showing where it doesn't.
Jan
30
comment How to convince an employer to move to VB.Net for new development?
ROI is the right approach, but the human factor (boss comfort/preference) tends to win out. A bad manager will put their technical skills or lack thereof ahead of the best choice. It is also worth noting that waiting until the risk is realized, especially if there will be some time to react, isn't bad. With a confirmed risk(e.g. doesn't work with Win8), getting significant resources for an important code base is much easier and likely to be larger than without which could mean faster, but done properly.
Jan
29
comment What quantitative metrics do you use to measure the quality of an offshore testing team?
Generally agreed, but I would add number of bugs found and time given to test. I've seen teams deliver code that just wouldn't run. By the time the test team was given code that met basic sanity checking criteria, three quarters of the time left for testing had expired.
Jan
25
answered At What Point Should You Start To Think About Performance?
Jan
20
awarded  Teacher
Jan
20
answered What makes Agile software development so appealing?
Sep
20
awarded  Supporter
Sep
20
awarded  Autobiographer