934 reputation
47
bio website jimrush.net
location Phoenix, AZ
age 45
visits member for 4 years
seen Jul 10 at 2:11

I bought my first computer, a TI 99/4A at the age of 14. From that moment on, I knew I wanted to write software.

Many computers, operating systems, and programming languages later, I still enjoy writing software. In those days, the code might have been to play a tune, a lunar lander clone or even a little hardware integration to turn on and off lights. Today, I design and write software for enterprise customers. But, there is still a little time for those small utility applications that help out around the house.


Sep
9
comment “Employee morale is the employee's responsibility”
Dry, dark humor. If those words typically don't work for you, you won't enjoy the book. I've seen places where morale is in the toilet for long periods of time and work is getting done in a cost effective manner. This doesn't necessarily mean highly creative work, but much of software development doesn't need to be highly creative. Enjoy.
Sep
9
comment “Employee morale is the employee's responsibility”
Maintaining by keeping them happy is just one way. Making them feel like they aren't worth enough to go anywhere else is another. Yes, its evil, no I don't believe in it. Happiness as a responsibility of management is more of a cultural (company) artifact in most companies.
Sep
9
comment “Employee morale is the employee's responsibility”
I quibble with your first and main statement. Given the goals of for profit businesses, that isn't a main responsibility. As for my personal opinion, I'm not that type of manager (I'm at the other end of the spectrum). However, demotivational approaches can actually create a good ROI for many businesses. For an entertaining bit of sarcasm that has more than a bit of truth, check out "The Art of Demotivation." As for the morality of being that kind of manager, I'll leave it to others.
Sep
9
comment “Employee morale is the employee's responsibility”
A manager's main responsibility is productivity. In most cases, morale as part of a motivation is a significant factor in productivity, but it doesn't have to be.
Aug
30
comment Dealing with inflexible programmers
@Wayne: I think we are just arguing terminology. Those reasons, to me, aren't ignorance. Under the best possible light, they reflect issues with prioritization of short term/long term costs/gains and corporate(external to team) culture. However, it is usually a motivational issue. Those issues are much harder to solve than a lack of education.
Aug
30
comment Dealing with inflexible programmers
@Wayne: if it were just technical ignorance, simply pointing out the gaps in knowledge would be sufficient. Given that isn't the case, it is far more than ignorance. Many people, by their nature and situation, are resistant to change. As for the reasons, lots. A simple search of "why are people resistant to change" will yield large numbers of useful results.
Jul
8
comment Worst coding standard you've ever had to follow?
@Bernard-In most organizations creating a long term revenue stream is grounds for rapid promotion. Hopefully, somebody else saw the insanity in this and accidentally ran him/her over in the parking lot.
May
26
comment How should a programmer plan his life for future
In practice, I see wage, attitude (desire to continue growing and learning versus having a life) and speed being factors. If you are in the average or below average part of the bell curve, it gets increasingly harder the older you get. Want to survive, be in the upper part of the bell curve. However, good news, 75% of developers think they are in the top 25%.
May
24
comment Who does the UX on a scrum project?
Defining the UX role and responsibilities would be a useful starting point in this question. In the broadest sense, UX is everything the user experiences and goes well beyond what the code does and is often the responsibility of multiple people.
Mar
20
comment What ways are there to determine if an idea for change is viable or not?
@Kenneth Maybe I'm missing the point of your question and thoughts, but it seems incredibly minor versus the goal: Writing rich and functional user interfaces. Your commentary doesn't seem to associate a problem related to the goal. Unless this isn't your goal and this is purely an academic exploration. If so, it really doesn't matter what people use or do. Things like terminology will continue to evolve as the art and science of UI design and implementation evolves.
Mar
4
comment UI Testing with Visual Studio 2010 Feature Pack 2
@Seth-not sure how much it matters. This is such an immature area that each significant release is likely to change the game. Given that MS finally has the automated testing bug(pun intended), their offering should continue to improve. Telerik will probably be focused on taking the MS solution to the next level.
Feb
16
comment Software bug/defect classification
What problem are you trying to solve ?
Feb
16
comment Dealing with inflexible programmers
@Marci-I've always believed the field of software development has allowed a percentage of the population from avoiding mental health hospitals. Not that they shouldn't be institutionalized, but that they can hide within some development teams.
Jan
30
comment Are performance and salary reviews *really* harmful?
I agree with the answer, because it tends to be right in practice. A good manager should work hard to overcome the limits of the common system and be focused on building strong individuals and teams. Way too much easily found backing material out there to try and simplify here. Judge your manager and company on how they handle this problem and take action if necessary.
Jan
30
comment How much Code Coverage is “enough”?
I like the number (70%). As my teams get higher, I tend to start finding tests for coverage than for value. On the WPF comment, we are just in the beginning days. Meaning, we aren't building/structuring WPF code to be easily testable. Mock models help. When designing code, design it to be testable. And, yes, at this point there are limited examples so you'll have think about it. No different than where most developers were as TDD was introduced to them for the first time just less industry experience.
Jan
30
comment TDD with limited resources
One addition: Initially, look for highest value tests. Tests that let you know, early, you've broken your code base. These tend to be high, sweeping tests that don't tell you what you broke, but that you broke it. You'll very quickly see the value of a CI, with testing, environment. Use tests to debug breakage. With a system in place, the costs of adding new tests starts getting easier/cheaper and you can focus on more tests that do a better job of proving that it works and showing where it doesn't.
Jan
30
comment How to convince an employer to move to VB.Net for new development?
ROI is the right approach, but the human factor (boss comfort/preference) tends to win out. A bad manager will put their technical skills or lack thereof ahead of the best choice. It is also worth noting that waiting until the risk is realized, especially if there will be some time to react, isn't bad. With a confirmed risk(e.g. doesn't work with Win8), getting significant resources for an important code base is much easier and likely to be larger than without which could mean faster, but done properly.
Jan
29
comment What quantitative metrics do you use to measure the quality of an offshore testing team?
Generally agreed, but I would add number of bugs found and time given to test. I've seen teams deliver code that just wouldn't run. By the time the test team was given code that met basic sanity checking criteria, three quarters of the time left for testing had expired.