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location Poland
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Software engineer with a few years of professional experience, skilled in C# and Java (I've done some work in PHP as well). Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist in Windows applications.

Also active on: http://stackoverflow.com/users/168719/konrad-morawski

My profile on LinkedIn: http://pl.linkedin.com/pub/konrad-morawski/a6/129/b07


Polish equivalent to StackOverflow: http://devpytania.pl/

My profile there: http://devpytania.pl/users/1672/konrad-morawski


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comment Speed up familiarizing process of a new IDE?
@JimmyHoffa I understand that. So, it is my two pennies that PHP, indeed, is such a language :) Perhaps even more so, since it tends to be messy. To be honest, personally I don't believe that there are any languages whose use couldn't be made easier and more productive thanks to a proper IDE. That some languages simply happen not to have a solid IDE I believe, but not as a result of some innate, inherent qualities of these languages. One day I may stand corrected of course.
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revised What GUI is used in industry for c++
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comment Speed up familiarizing process of a new IDE?
@JimmyHoffa as soon as you have to refactor a big chunk of PHP spaghetti into a method, you appreciate what PhpStorm has to offer - doing the same thing manually can take an hour, and you are still likely to miss some variables. I experienced that using NetBeans, which is obviously an IDE already, only not that sophisticated.
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comment Speed up familiarizing process of a new IDE?
Other than that, well, I'd say: a) learn how to navigate around the project first, this is what you'll be doing most often (in compare eg. to refactoring features) b) never settle for doing tedious things 'manually' just because you don't know how to use the IDE. It's a matter of mindset. Look for the command or shortcut every time you feel that not knowing it holds you back. These wasted seconds add up over time...
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comment Speed up familiarizing process of a new IDE?
I believe PhpStorm tries to make it easy by 1. offering a few sets of keyboard shortcut schemes out of the box (eg. if you have used Visual Studio before, you can switch to familiar VS shortcuts straight away without having to reconfigure them all manually), 2. displaying useful tips at startup. Pay attention to those, many of features they tell you about are real timesavers.
Oct
15
answered Decorator Pattern: can it solve issues arising from changes to underlying code?
Oct
15
comment WPF Certification - worth it?
Not everyone thinks WPF is doomed. See blog.pluralsight.com/future-of-xaml, for example - and while it's surely debetable, the expiry date for 70-511 is not a strong argument either way. Besides, I'm really not sure whether certificate matters that much, especially as a substitute for experience. I'd rather show off a personal, open-source project done professionally in WPF than a certificate on any given day. But this is a very subjective matter, and thus the question is likely to get closed. It's a Q&A site, not a forum...
Oct
12
comment Efficient Code Design for Pattern Search Using a Singleton Pattern
@Zeos any time you have a specific question, post it here please. That's what the forum is for, and as much as everyone can share their insights with you, there's plenty of other readers who may benefit from it. I have learned tremendously by confronting my ideas with the experience shared by others on StackExchange. General software design brainstorming here, more specific problems on stackoverflow.com, and there is also codereview.stackexchange.com for polishing your solution once you got it thought through and working.
Oct
12
comment Efficient Code Design for Pattern Search Using a Singleton Pattern
Store the PatternMatch objects from the output in some sort of a context object, whose life is maintained by putting it in MyApp or some sort of its equivalent for the given platform, the use of a static object is not out of question but should be done sparringly. Write unit test using an arbitrary, dummy Pattern created solely for this test (the ability to do this is by itself a litmus test of a good architecture). This is a sample approach not a holy grail of course
Oct
12
comment Efficient Code Design for Pattern Search Using a Singleton Pattern
Patterns namespace, public IPattern and a number of specific patterns as stand-alone classes. PatternsFactory creating a collection of all currently supported patterns. PatternMatch class with a readonly IPattern field (set in the constructor once and immutable after that) and a collection of data entries that satisfied the specific pattern. MatchFinder, taking a collection of Patterns as an input and spitting out a collection of identified PatternMatches.
Oct
12
comment Efficient Code Design for Pattern Search Using a Singleton Pattern
You're welcome. As far as books are concerned, I'd start with "Clean Code" (by Robert C. Martin) before diving into design patterns :)
Oct
12
comment Efficient Code Design for Pattern Search Using a Singleton Pattern
Code design is a very broad subject, but I think your mindset is that you wish to design a program like a monument. However since the only permanent thing is change (even if it's a personal project, if you care about the design at all, it's likely not a throw-away single-use one), you should design for change instead. Also, don't use a design pattern just for the sake of doing so (if you are not sure whether you should). This is known as cargo-cult programming. The use of design pattern should answer a specific need, not be a goal in its own right :)
Oct
12
comment Efficient Code Design for Pattern Search Using a Singleton Pattern
It depends on what exact application it is, but eg. in WPF you subclass the Application object and you could keep your data in MyApp, see http://www.ageektrapped.com/blog/the-wpf-application-class-overview-and-gotcha/‌​ - MyApp is not static, but you have a guarantee that there's only ever going to be one instance of it, and that it will live throughout the entire application session (because it is the application).
Oct
12
comment Efficient Code Design for Pattern Search Using a Singleton Pattern
If you need to keep track of which matches were detected by which pattern, then yes you could have a Dictionary with various IPattern as keys, or maybe even a dedicated PatternMatch class (consisting of an IPattern and a collection of matches), which could be more convenient in the long run - see programmer.97things.oreilly.com/wiki/index.php/… The recommended choice would depend on the broader context. The important thing is that these solutions do not require knowing a precise, finite list of available patterns beforehand.
Oct
12
comment Efficient Code Design for Pattern Search Using a Singleton Pattern
@Zeos happy to hear this, glad I could help
Oct
12
revised Efficient Code Design for Pattern Search Using a Singleton Pattern
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Oct
12
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Oct
12
comment Efficient Code Design for Pattern Search Using a Singleton Pattern
I am not sure that I do need a singleton - if so, I wouldn't use it. When in doubt, err on the safe side. I just posted an answer trying to tackle your doubts.
Oct
12
answered Efficient Code Design for Pattern Search Using a Singleton Pattern
Oct
12
comment Efficient Code Design for Pattern Search Using a Singleton Pattern
It is not clear to me why you think you need a singleton in the first place. If thread safety is a concern, why not just instantiate an independent, separate pattern searching instance for each thread? This is as thread safe as it gets