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Apr
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
10
comment Why are large amounts of magic numbers acceptable in CSS and SVGs?
Interesting enough i just ran into this question that talks about taking abstraction too far, and losing out on both maintainability and development time.
Apr
9
comment Why are large amounts of magic numbers acceptable in CSS and SVGs?
It's good CSS has features in both directions. And it is up to the web developer to decide how much time to spend on reducing redundancy and increasing maintainability, or time to spend at crunching out new pages/features. Interesting enough, the same holds true for any other programming language where you can spend months to lay out the perfect design, or days to whack down your program, and months to hunt down impossible bugs.
Apr
9
comment Why are large amounts of magic numbers acceptable in CSS and SVGs?
@PeterMortensen This is always a consideration between low development time, or high maintainability. High redundancy is easy to develop because you can quickly change things here and there, low redundancy is easy on maintenance because you can quickly change global style. In practice you want to be somewhere in between the two, because face it, having a global style makes it a lot easier even to add new pages, but having every last obscure feature adhere any possible global style change takes forever to develop.
Apr
8
awarded  Yearling
Apr
8
revised Why are large amounts of magic numbers acceptable in CSS and SVGs?
added 1 character in body
Apr
8
answered Why are large amounts of magic numbers acceptable in CSS and SVGs?
Feb
25
comment Scrum - Dealing with failed sprints and deadlines
Perhaps if those Scrum-Addicts managers had paid more attention during those pesky "retrospective" meetings, they would have had the chance to hit the brake at week 1 or 2, instead of watching the project steer towards the cliff, and hit the gas pedal.
Aug
26
revised Appropriate to put known issues directly in software?
added 1 character in body
Aug
5
revised Appropriate to put known issues directly in software?
added 4 characters in body
Aug
5
answered Appropriate to put known issues directly in software?
Jul
20
comment rand() gives same numbers again for a small range
@RabeezRiaz No need to shuffle the entire list, if you only need a small number of random values, just shuffle the part you need (as in, take a random value from the list of 1..400, remove it, and repeat until you have enough elements). In fact that's how a shuffling algorithm works anyway.
Jun
23
awarded  Commentator
Jun
23
comment How safe is it to compile a piece of source code from a random stranger?
This answer is total gibberish. There is no reason at all why a compiler would be inherently safe, or at least safer than something that does a simple task like setting up a SSL connection, yet recently a popular library contained a vulnerability. I would even argue that, because compilers are generally not used in a hostile environment (like the internet), they are less checked for vulnerabilities, and therefore more likely to have them.
Jun
13
awarded  Yearling
May
5
comment Is my usage of explicit casting operator reasonable or a bad hack?
@Telastyn true, might actually be a good idea to implement this properly and encapsulate a SmallObject as well.
May
5
comment Is my usage of explicit casting operator reasonable or a bad hack?
I still find it lightly confusing that .ToSmallObject() would be a data-losing operation. Why not .GetSmallObject(), populated with the data from BigObject?
Jan
23
comment Throw exception or let code fail
Personally I would use a assertion here, that still gives a exception when you try to debug this, but wont take up any resources when you build a release. Unless you load materials from a arbitrary source at runtime, then better keep the exception.
Nov
18
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Sep
30
comment Is it better to have separate functions or add more arguments to a function?
You can still stick to DRY by adding a private function setVoltage(channel,voltage) that's called by the 4 other functions. That even allows you to add some special cases to all separate functions,for example not all of them might have the same max voltage.