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Oct
6
comment What should someone learn to become a great web-app builder by 2015
Babylonians Egyptians and other civilizations certainly had algorithms for rather precise computations, so centuries is an understatement...
Sep
21
comment How to maintain same code fragments on multiple projects
This describes a working approach: extracting a library requests some work which may be or not possible under the time constraints of the OP so this approach has its merits.
Sep
9
comment Understanding binary numbers in terms of real world objects
Morse code is a nice example of a specific notation (albeit not positional :-): you go with the flow of it rather than consciously thinking "ok, now the sequence for S was...?". For this reason it could happen that one is better able to "write it" than to "read it" or vice versa.
Sep
9
comment Why did an interviewer ask me a question about people eating curry?
A general comment: the point about the "estimate" should be interpreted as an order of magnitude (something which is typical of physicist's reasoning). So: how many piano tuners in Chicago should be answered like: they are O(100), O(1000), O(10000) or whatever. How many people will eat curry: are they in the hundred of thousands, in the millions, in the tens of millions? If you know that there are O(1bn) people in the South East and you just know that curry is a favoured spice in that part of the world you can "guess" the order of magnitude of people which will have it for dinner tonight
Jul
15
comment Cannot understand a certain point in Agile Manifesto Principles
you're welcome :-)
Jul
6
comment I've inherited 200K lines of spaghetti code — what now?
@SkippyFastol I understand your point, I really think that you should ask a question about it to provide answers on topic. I don't think that a fresh analysis of a chemical plant can be done surprisingly fast, but maybe it's simply because I'm getting older :-) I'm not saying that one must improve the things, but I recommend against rewriting from scratch, that's it :-) Have you read the link by Joel Spolsky reported by @Govert?
Jul
6
comment I've inherited 200K lines of spaghetti code — what now?
@SkippyFastol sorry, maybe I wasn't clear. I have not seen OP's code, obviously. I have seen a lot of code running today (even in large experiments) written in languages (and with techniques) which neither I nor more expert programmers than me would willingly choose (I am explicitly referring to the scientific domain). But in all those cases, a complete rewrite was a temptation to be resisted. Try it and you will see :-) Really, programmers.stackexchange.com/a/155505/3011 says it much better than me.
Jul
6
comment I've inherited 200K lines of spaghetti code — what now?
@SkippyFastol I don't think that comments are the best place to discuss about that. Maybe you could ask a question about it? In short: OP has a working program full of deeply specific knowledge, of an incredibly complex process (a chemical processing plant). Rewriting it from scratch will lead to a worse outcome than following the sensible approaches suggested by a lot of good answers here. I am reflecting my experience: I've been there... and had to resist to the strong temptation of starting again :-)
Jul
4
comment I've inherited 200K lines of spaghetti code — what now?
Whatever you do, don't rewrite this from scratch. It would be a serious mistake. 20 years of chemical knowledge: it's stuff that you would never be able to recreate. And you would rightly lose the respect from the scientists.
Apr
22
comment What kind of problems does MapReduce solve?
In case you have the solution, remember that you are only eligible for your Fields medal if you are under 40.
Mar
26
comment C is written in C, how is this possible?
Unless you are from the Star Wars universe (where parsecs are apparently units for measuring time and not distance), you could change that to "years of google studying" :-)
Mar
26
comment What is the difference between Static code analysis and code review?
@Buhb: it crucially adds knowledge of the context. A code reviewer should understand if the code is doing what is expected to do. A static tool will (at best, if the language allows for it via some decoration/assertion/contract) check that formally everything is ok... So you could put it the other way: static analysis is a sort of code review, performed algorithmically.
Feb
16
comment What is the most effective way to add functionality to unfamiliar, structurally unsound code?
+1, this is a very good and sensible approach.
Feb
7
comment Problems (such as maintenance) in development with unpopular language
Tcl is a nice language, I wouldn't call it tedious. Just look at Tkinter (in Python) to see that it is a nice tool to know.
Dec
12
comment Is there an expiration date for well regarded, but old books on programming?
The C Programming language is timeless. Such a distilled book is rare. I have re-read it for the ... I don't know, I lost the count (I read it for the first time when I was 13) and I still appreciate it. Rather, I appreciate it much more now.
Jun
21
comment Why should main() be short?
The code is not terrible, mainly there are switch cases and the handling of multiple platforms. What exactly you find terrible?