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  • 49 votes cast
Apr
9
comment Is there a name for “leak” of CPU usage?
(also, if I saved current session, quit Firefox, started it again, restoring the session, the CPU usage after initial surge would go to something like 20%... then continue to climb over several next days)
Apr
9
comment Is there a name for “leak” of CPU usage?
@Erik: at this very moment my Firefox session consumes 40% of memory out of about 60% used by the whole system (and remaining 40% being free). Meanwhile, CPU load (caused by Firefox) oscillates around 200%, and switching a tab takes some 6 seconds. Despite none of the tabs having anything computationally intensive - one paused Youtube movie, a bunch of pictures, some sites that do maybe one AJAX connection per minute. I just wanted to know how if there's a name for this situation.
Apr
9
accepted Is there a name for “leak” of CPU usage?
Apr
9
comment Is there a name for “leak” of CPU usage?
I'm seeing three close votes for "primarily OPINION based" on a question that asks for an OFFICIAL name for given effect. WTF?? Do you all really think calling the situation where a program repeatedly doesn't deallocate memory where it should, "Memory Leak" is also an opinion-based issue?
Apr
9
comment Is there a name for “leak” of CPU usage?
@BasileStarynkevitch: Still, that waste may be constant, a problem of optimality but not one that makes for a critical bug, one that makes the program useless in the long run. Imagine you have to quit and restart the app every hour or two to keep it running.
Apr
9
asked Is there a name for “leak” of CPU usage?
Mar
4
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
22
comment How to respond when you are asked for an estimate?
And there's always... "It's six hours of work. Now when will these six hours of work be scheduled, that's out of my hands, talk to my boss."
Nov
22
comment How to respond when you are asked for an estimate?
A much better question in this situation is "When should I ask you about the estimate again?" - sometimes this will require a second derivative answer: "I will know answer to THAT in three days." It rarely goes more meta than this. Otherwise, I'm giving a wiiiide bracket: "Anything between an hour and two weeks. We're searching; it's an hour since found until fixed, but it first needs to be found."
Nov
18
comment Why do we still use JavaScript?
@Jason All language flaws can be overcome by adopting coding habits that nullify their impact. It doesn't mean there are no flaws or they are not flaws. It just means efficient workarounds have been found.
Sep
22
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
19
comment Why would it ever be possible for Java to be faster than C++?
@KonradRudolph: This is all true when it comes to clarity and ease of writing the code, making it bug-free and maintainable. The point about efficiency of the algorithm implementation still stands though: if you're about to write obj.fetchFromDatabase("key") three times within five lines of code for the same key, you'll think twice whether to fetch that value once and cache it in a local variable. If you write obj->"key" with -> being overloaded to act as database fetch, you're far more prone to just let it pass because the cost of the operation isn't apparent.
Sep
18
comment Why would it ever be possible for Java to be faster than C++?
@KonradRudolph: If the deadline is in a week, you don't measure, you write the goddamned code and pray not to make too many bugs because there's hardly any time to fix them. And operator overloading is very, very handy at writing code faster completely regardless of how much overhead given overload creates.
Jul
5
awarded  Yearling
Feb
7
comment Root cause analysis in event correlation
@MahendraGunawardena: These were just examples - some of hundreds of possible problems. The question is about creating a system that would discover root causes like these in multitude of input data, not about resolving the three example problems. The blockade line is a system-wide line which halts the operation of all modules - any module can activate it if in case of an unrecoverable error. PSU supplies power to everything. And no, I haven't created that system until now - there are always "higher priority tasks" and developing this is continually pushed back.
Feb
5
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
3
comment Why do bitwise operators have lower priority than comparisons?
@supercat: If I need x ? y : 0 I write x ? y : 0. OTOH, I frequently write status = (threshold > thresh_max)*MASK_MAX_EXCEEDED + (threshold < thresh_min)*MASK_MIN_EXCEEDED + (!!alarm)*MASK_ALARM + (motor_out!=motor_in)*MASK_MOTOR_ERROR; etc. The fact boolean expressions produce 0 or 1 only is very comfortable, allowing to turn many conditionals into simple multiplications (which additionally avoid branches in pipeline, meaning better efficiency.)
Sep
8
comment Can any GPLv2 licensed library be used in a company's internal intranet application?
@keppla: Yes, and that means: Use it, but be aware of it. Keep semi-clear borders between your proprietary and GPL'd, so that if the time of change comes you won't find yourself hopelessly entangled. "Business secrets" separated with good abstraction layer of some glue logic from GPL parts.
Sep
5
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
6
comment Recursion or while loops
@dan_waterworth: This is all again about writing. While writing you happily accept what the function means and enjoy the simplicity, assuming the function is correct. Debugging is all about "what the function actually does, versus what it was supposed to do", and all the elegance and simplicity of writing crashes on your head. "Dirty mechanics" which recursion manages to hide efficiently is where usually the problem lies, and debugging stuff that happens behind the scenes is always harder than debugging what lies out in the open.