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visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Apr 8 at 8:50

I'm a software engineer passionate about coding, web development and applications architecture.

You can read more about me on my own website or on my stackoverflow professional profile.

Here are some projects I'm working on:

@matthieunapoli


Apr
7
comment Is a Document NoSQL database appropriate for backing an email system?
Your answer makes me think that I can also re-request the full email content to the IMAP server if needed, but I can store a text/parsed version of the email in the DB (e.g. using github.com/willdurand/EmailReplyParser). That saves me of using maildir and storing everything, while still having the conversations available to display them to the user…
Apr
7
comment Is a Document NoSQL database appropriate for backing an email system?
@gnat feel free to tell me in which SO chatroom you are so that we can discuss it more extensively
Apr
7
comment Is a Document NoSQL database appropriate for backing an email system?
@gnat I just removed one wrong word in the title and I honestly believe it's all good now. I don't want a recommendation of one NoSQL database over another, I just want to know in NoSQL database are appropriate for such use case. Is that good now? -_-
Apr
7
revised Is a Document NoSQL database appropriate for backing an email system?
edited title
Apr
7
comment Is a Document NoSQL database appropriate for backing an email system?
I like the idea of the mixed approach, it seems reasonable. However as you can guess, if I can get away with only MongoDB (or similar), I'd rather avoid handling 2 systems, especially one (maildir) that I don't know at all.
Apr
7
comment Is a Document NoSQL database appropriate for backing an email system?
In terms of volume as I said it's several thousands of users, and the volume of an average inbox. For fetching, I meant fetching the 20 latest mails, just like you suggest. I don't see a point to display all the emails in the webmail.
Apr
7
comment Is a Document NoSQL database appropriate for backing an email system?
@JeffO what do you mean? Like a SaaS that will fetch the emails, store them and index them for me? Or a binary that I install on the server?
Apr
7
asked Is a Document NoSQL database appropriate for backing an email system?
Mar
25
comment Is displaying an HTML email a security risk?
Thank you for the answer. I'm surprised it's such a problem, there are so many mail clients how do they all do if that is so complex? And I mean "Safe" like any other webmail (i.e. not necessarily the safest in the world). Phishing/beacons are out of scope (for my question at least), I'm not focusing on privacy or human error-related risks (yet).
Mar
25
comment Is displaying an HTML email a security risk?
@dan1111 Thanks for your comment, but I definitely don't want to go down that path of discussing whether or not I want to do what I want to do :) (I have a bit of experience of stack exchange to know it leads nowhere)
Mar
25
asked Is displaying an HTML email a security risk?
Nov
20
awarded  Famous Question
Feb
11
comment Alternative to “Passing/Broken build” indicator?
@Earlz Exactly! What I'm wondering is "is it done by someone, somewhere? And are there tools that support that (CI and unit testing libraries?" Because if I just categorized those tests with classic CI and unit-tests tools, the build will always fail anyway and I won't see a difference between which tests failed, and so it won't be useful :/
Feb
11
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
8
comment Alternative to “Passing/Broken build” indicator?
Simply tracking the number of failing tests is insufficient that's not the only possible metric. For example: Branch-A improves it to 40 tests (80% passing) with no regression. No regression means previously passing tests always pass. In short, a test would be allowed to fail as long as it has never passed. It seems to me that we are missing on good things by constraining to forbid failing tests in main branches. (of course it would require tools working differently: unit tests, CI, ...)
Feb
8
awarded  Commentator
Feb
8
comment Alternative to “Passing/Broken build” indicator?
@MadKeithV Exactly
Feb
8
comment Alternative to “Passing/Broken build” indicator?
the build would always have failing tests precisely! But is that such a bad thing? Our only metric is "the build is broken or not", but your code could be full of known bugs, so that doesn't really mean anything except there is no regression. In a perfect world, every tracker issue would have a test (reproducing is easier than fixing). So the upside would be to see that 35 tests/70% of all the tests are passing, that Branch-A improves it to 40 tests (80%) with no regression, and that Branch-B has regressions. Today you could only say Master and Branch-A are OK and Branch-B is broken.
Feb
8
awarded  Editor
Feb
8
revised Alternative to “Passing/Broken build” indicator?
added 9 characters in body