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Feb
22
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Jul
15
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Jul
15
comment Can Agile software development be used in projects defined by a contract?
@Martin Wickman: I don't believe you read my comment very well. It says "...refine your definition after each iteration.", so obviously I am aware that all projects have changes and I have identified a way to manage it. You could have helped by better defining "a deliverable product which the client can use". But instead you chose sarcasm. How unfortunate.
Jul
15
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accepted Can Agile software development be used in projects defined by a contract?
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Jul
15
comment Can Agile software development be used in projects defined by a contract?
@Martin Wickman: I understand this, but "a deliverable product which the client can use" is the problem here. If this is the case, the first iteration could take months, because for some projects the customer cannot use an incomplete application. For some projects, I think you need to define finished first, then you can break it into iterations and refine your definition after each iteration. But you MUST ALWAYS have this definition.
Jul
15
comment Can Agile software development be used in projects defined by a contract?
@KeithS let us continue this discussion in chat
Jul
15
comment Can Agile software development be used in projects defined by a contract?
@KeithS: Also, your first statement "Agile does not encourage the project's requirements to change" seems to be in conflict with the 2nd principle of the Agile Manifesto: "Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage." I'm beginning to think there are many interpretations of this methodology.
Jul
15
comment Can Agile software development be used in projects defined by a contract?
@KeithS: Thanks for response. I would like to better understand, but I find the analogy valid. There seems to be a point (80% ~ 100%) finished that would be acceptable. The unfinished rooms and kitchen appliances would fall in that unfinished 20%. But it seems anything less than 80% is a failure, and this is the trouble I'm having with agile. The project is a failure until 80% of the iterations are complete. But what if the project ran out of time, money, etc... at 70%?
Jul
15
comment Can Agile software development be used in projects defined by a contract?
@Dunk: "What if a customer contracted for a house but the money ran out before the roof was put on? The agile camp would still call that a success. Nobody else would; in particular the customer" This is exactly the problem I have with the Agile methodology.
Jul
15
comment Can Agile software development be used in projects defined by a contract?
+1 for the great article. Thank you.
Jul
15
comment Can Agile software development be used in projects defined by a contract?
As I learn more about this, I am coming to the same conclusion. Your last sentence seems to be absolutely correct. I used to work for the government and my customer was the agency I worked for, and programs had to be maintained for years and years as long as there were employees using them. I can see agile working there. Now I develop embedded systems. The project ends when the machine works (all or nothing). If the machine partially works, it can't be sold - project failed.
Jul
14
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Jul
14
comment Can Agile software development be used in projects defined by a contract?
@Michael: I challenge your statement that there is no such thing as all or nothing. I develop software for machine control. On my current project, if I delivered even one missing feature, the machine would not work completely and my customer could not sell it. That is what I mean by all or nothing. I could see how some projects could be partially completed and still be of value, but I think "all or nothing" does exist. Unless I missing something.
Jul
14
comment Can Agile software development be used in projects defined by a contract?
Dale, thank you for your thoughts. I think this only works if the customer is paying for each iteration individually and values each iteration as a product itself. I don't see how this could work well for fixed-cost products or products that require all or nothing.
Jul
14
comment Can Agile software development be used in projects defined by a contract?
1. No more money - Customer spent all their money on an incomplete useless product. 2. No more time - Customer still has an incomplete useless product. 3. Nothing to add - Yeah right! 4. Not worth it - Customer just gave up on the project. --- What am I missing? This doesn't make sense to me.
Jul
14
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14
asked Can Agile software development be used in projects defined by a contract?