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seen Sep 2 '12 at 21:39

Sep
9
comment Why and for what reasons developers may not like “daily scrum”?
If you only want a meeting to go x length, use a clock or even an egg-timer. I find the stand-up part juvenile and insulting.
Sep
9
answered My boss wants a narrated line-by-line English explanation of our code
Sep
9
comment My boss wants a narrated line-by-line English explanation of our code
Whitehawk, commenting has its place. Lately, the best practice has been to write code clearly so that commenting is less needed. The problem with commenting everything is it violates DRY resulting in two sets of codes to maintain--the actual code and the psudo code comments. Imagin how much trouble there's going to be when the boss insists that something works one way when it doesn't (code changed and comments not, or the boss simply misunderstood the comments).
Sep
2
comment Are there revision repositories which implement commenting on revisions other than a fixed single commit message?
+1 note taken. I don't use Git, but it seems at a glance that it is part of Git and not an add on, which seems a good start. However, because git/notes also use a --commit syntax, and merging into the standard commit comment is mentioned as a possible future change, I'm unsure if notes are obvious when one is scanning commits (as I think they'd have to be without requiring some other workflow). I'll have to install and play with it to understand. Thanks.
Sep
2
comment Are there revision repositories which implement commenting on revisions other than a fixed single commit message?
Currently Visual Studio Premium and Mercurial. I do have access to TFS though I haven't bothered using it so far (solo developer). I will look at Trac to see if it elegantly works around the problem, side-steps it, or actually directly addresses the issues raised in the other thread. Thanks.
Sep
2
comment Are there revision repositories which implement commenting on revisions other than a fixed single commit message?
+1 Thanks old wise bird. I'm still interested in if there are any implementations that are less work arounds which do not require addons. I'm not sure that solutions like Trac don't introduce the burden of requiring users to go to an additional window. It is certainly a tool I'd like to understand and study better. Thank you for pointing it out.
Sep
2
awarded  Student
Sep
2
asked Are there revision repositories which implement commenting on revisions other than a fixed single commit message?
Sep
2
comment Why can't I edit an SVN commit message?
@l0b0 I’m finding this question interesting the more I consider it. My first reaction was along the lines of, just write more carefully. The current practice seems to hamstring the process. I too wonder if any other systems implement a more robust practice. Time for another question methinks. +1
Sep
2
comment Programmer Ethics: Can I fork a project from one code host to another?
I don’t see this as an ethical question, but I draw a distinction between ethics and courtesies. Your actual question seems to be, “Can I fork a project from one code host to another?” The answer would seem to require knowing which conditions are placed upon the code.
Sep
2
comment Does Microsoft have a free version of Visual Studio?
@Dark Though you did not ask, some of the features included in the paid versions of VS can be easily replaced with Open Source alternatives. For instance, VS Express doesn’t include MS’s test suite (MSTest), but you’re free to use Open Source alternatives like NUnit, MBUnit, xUnit, etc.
Sep
2
comment Learning potentially unrelated materials on company's dime, is it acceptable?
That said, where I draw lines personally is job related (over work related) and unless it is somehow connected to my particular job role I try not to blur lines. That said, I don’t take jobs where I wouldn’t be expected to keep current in the field and learn new technologies.
Sep
2
comment Learning potentially unrelated materials on company's dime, is it acceptable?
I am always suspicious when ethics are invoked as top down systems, doubly so when business and ethics appear in the same sentence. I can’t remember the last time (since I am fairly sure it has never happened) that a company reimbursed me for knowledge they benefited from which I gained outside of the job and after being employed. Imagine their faces if I suggested it would be unethical for them to benefit from the conference I paid out of pocket, or some book I read at home?
Sep
2
revised Why can't I edit an SVN commit message?
added SVN to question to make it easier to spot this is an SVN specific question.
Sep
2
suggested suggested edit on Why can't I edit an SVN commit message?
Sep
2
comment Why can't I edit an SVN commit message?
@l0b0 isn’t it objectively worse to continue to disseminate information which is false, misleading, or prone to do damage? Record keeping does not require enshrining bad data.
Sep
2
comment Why can't I edit an SVN commit message?
@Thomas I'm going to disagree with you here. It seems a defendable point to suggest that the commit comment should always best represent the change. Ultimately, you're placing historical accuracy of the entry above accurately representing the change. If you want a log for auditing purposes, okay. Being able to not point out errors in commit messages or protect against others basing decisions on incorrect commit messages is just asking for trouble.
Sep
2
awarded  Editor
Aug
27
awarded  Scholar
Aug
26
awarded  Commentator