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comment Why have many programmers moved to using exception handling for input or output?
Obvious troll is obvious. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invariant_%28computer_science%29
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comment What kinds of Open-Source licenses are NOT OK to use internally in a corporation?
@Brandin: GPLv2 and GPLv3 have the same issues as AGPL. LGPL is often OK, depending on what kind of product you work on. Apache, MIT, and BSD are permissive. I don't think anyone other than Mozilla uses MPL. WTFPL doesn't explicitly let you do anything, relicensing is just one possible interpretation of the license. Believe me or don't, I don't care; I'm telling you how it is, most lawyers will tell you not to touch GPL and its offshoots with a 10-foot pole if you plan on doing any kind of commerce, related or not. Those licenses are specifically meant to "spread" open-source.
Mar
28
comment What kinds of Open-Source licenses are NOT OK to use internally in a corporation?
@hvd: It may shock you to know that corporate lawyers don't really care about things like "free" or "unfree". They care about "can we use this without getting sued?". Have you actually read the WTFPL? It tells you nothing. Read section 2 of the Apache License to see what a proper copyright clause looks like. The WTFPL neither explicitly grants a copyright license, nor does it make said license irrevocable. You don't need to read the FSF's evaluation - just look at the license yourself!
Mar
28
comment What kinds of Open-Source licenses are NOT OK to use internally in a corporation?
@hvd: You're citing a bunch of open-source software foundations as evidence here. My whole point is that these license agreements are generally fine for open-source software, but have a lot of problems when it comes to commercial purposes, even if the software is only "internal". One of the major issues with WTFPL is that it doesn't have a "no warranties" clause. To that, the authors respond "add your own", which doesn't address the issue at all. My source is actual corporate lawyers, both full-time and consultant. I neither need nor am inclined to search for an internet source.