341 reputation
211
bio website malcolm-soft.com
location New York, United States
age 24
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Apr 16 at 22:22

Mobile application developer who freaking loves what he does - that's the most apt description for me. I mainly spend time writing something for Android, but I also play a lot with other technologies as well.


Apr
14
awarded  Informed
Aug
8
comment What would you change about Java if you have a chance?
@MartijnVerburg Could you elaborate a little on generics and the problem of interoperability? Unfortunately, I wasn't able to find that information online.
Jul
25
comment I don't understand the arguments against operator overloading
Yet we have a << operator defined on streams which has nothing to do with the bitwise shift, right in the standard library of C++.
Jul
25
comment Why do old C-style method names continue being used in modern languages?
Yes, it works that way with given names. They are given randomly at birth when no one has even a slightest idea what the person is going to be like. You aren't saying that programmers usually pick a random name for the function, and then make it do something, are you? Even if some do, that's obviously a very poor programming style.
Jul
24
comment Why do old C-style method names continue being used in modern languages?
I don't think it's a good analogy. With given names, no one cares about the meaning behind the name because it has nothing to do with the actual person. With the method names it's quite the opposite: the closer the function name is tied to what it does, the better. It's not just a label.
Jul
15
comment Necessity to learn haskell language extension for production
@Davorak That's exactly the problem I'm talking about: everyone uses GHC, because this is the only still actively maintained compiler. Other compilers can't keep up, so no one can use them, and there's little reason to invest in them. As for the libraries: you pick libraries for the problem and work only with them. Say, if you need to read XML, you need just one XML-reading library. With extensions, however, it's not obvious when you need which. Though there's a problem with libraries too. Say, in Java there're just arrays and collections, and in Haskell there's a load of array libraries.
Jul
14
comment Necessity to learn haskell language extension for production
@Davorak Because instead of a single language we have zillion of different extension combinations, and you don't know anything about whether the code is going to compile on a certain compiler. Extensions make the code non-portable. And also this makes the language a pain to learn because instead of a single set of features which everyone uses there is tremendous amount of additional features, and you haven't got a clue which ones you have to know and use and which ones exist just because researchers are having fun.
Jun
25
comment Necessity to learn haskell language extension for production
"And that is true for any language/tool" - that's completely false. Say, take such languages as Java, C#, C++ - none of them have language extensions which are commonly found in real world applications code. If you have to use language extensions every time you need to write anything less trivial than "the online contest problem solutions", in my opinion, there's something very wrong with the language spec.
Feb
25
awarded  Caucus
Feb
4
comment Replacement for instanceof Java?
I'd say that's not always the case that you have to add the method to the class. For example, some code gets an exception and is supposed to do something with it depending on its type. Say, makes a report or does something to recover from error. This kind of functionality definitely doesn't suit the exceptions. Or, if the classes come from some external library, then you don't even have the means to modify these classes. In this case I think it is absolutely valid to rely on the instanceof.
Nov
21
comment Is there an excuse for short variable names?
I usually don't write i, j, k, I write something like personPos because then I won't forget what I'm iterating on and what the index represents.
Nov
20
comment Why aren't more desktop apps written with Qt?
@BillyONeal If you compare the amount of code, then you may give an edge to the languages that exist for a longer time but not necessarily are popular now. And also code in open source projects doesn't necessarily reflect the languages used in production. There is no accurate measure, you just have to select some parameter and stick to it.
Nov
8
comment Why does Java use UTF-16 for internal string representation?
Here is a quote from the Unicode FAQ: Originally, Unicode was designed as a pure 16-bit encoding, aimed at representing all modern scripts. (Ancient scripts were to be represented with private-use characters.) Over time, and especially after the addition of over 14,500 composite characters for compatibility with legacy sets, it became clear that 16-bits were not sufficient for the user community. Out of this arose UTF-16. At the time of Java release UTF-16 hasn't yet appeared, and UTF-8 was not a part of Unicode standard.
Sep
25
comment Best starting point for writing small desktop programs for Windows?
@CodyGray "Don't look anything at all like native" - that's only if the developer chooses to do so. You probably mean Metal look and feel. But a programmer can easily use anything he wants, including the native look and feel (this is how the components look on Windows XP if the app uses native look and feel).
Jul
28
awarded  Yearling
May
31
comment Stuck due to “knowing too much”
Why was this question closed? I don't get it. Questions on software architecture are on-topic. It is subjective, but definitely constructive. No wonder that less and less questions are asked on the site.
May
23
comment Who was the first programmer?
It always seemed a little strange to me that Babbage himself is not considered the first programmer. How can you design a machine and not make some algorithms for it in the process? Of course, this is a beautiful legend, and I'm kind of trying to make things more prosaic, so I'm sorry about that.
Apr
30
answered Writing commit messages as a solo developer?
Apr
1
comment Is there a language between C and C++?
@Giorgio Actually I share your point of view. Personally I would rather have several more specific tools rather than one all-encompassing. I use Java every day myself and find it very consistent (at least, a lot more so than C++). But some people prefer it the other way, and this can also work if they know how to use the vast array of features properly, as you have correctly put it.
Apr
1
comment Is there a language between C and C++?
@DeadMG "Good" is a rather subjective term. As for the usefullness of C++, I think no one will argue with that. A useful language can be unpopular, but it's hard to imagine how a useless language can reach high popularity. The discussion in the comments has become too long already, so going back to the point, complex tools can be a good or a bad thing depending on the given situation.