963 reputation
1118
bio website waynewerner.blogspot.com
location Greenwood, AR
age 30
visits member for 4 years, 7 months
seen Mar 18 at 11:57

I'm a husband to my beautiful wife, father to our children, Computer Science graduate from University of Central Arkansas. I love my wife, our children, computers, playing guitar (especially singing/playing for my wife and/or kids), bicycling (including taking my kids for rides in my bike trailer), woodworking, airbrushing, digital and traditional artistry, playing games with my family (traditional and digital), my poor Chevette that I had to sell, throwing knives, firearms, knot tying, rope making, whip making, and really just learning new stuff in general. If I don't know about it I probably want to learn about it, if only so I can make informed decisions about it.

My three favorite programming languages are Python, Lisp, and Assembly (though I'm not sure about the order of those last two languages...), and I currently develop in .NET languages, especially VB.

I think the CANSPAM act is one of the dumbest pieces of legislation in the history of the universe

Code I can write/read (where 1 is just barely, 3 is the average user, and 10 is the language designer/guru level):

  • Python - 6/10
  • C++ - 4/10
  • Perl - 3/10
  • Assembly - 3/10
  • HTML/JavaScript - 5/10
  • VB.NET - 5/10
  • C# - 5/10
  • Befunge - 2/10


Aug
8
comment Teaching kids to program - how to teach syntax?
+1 for the article on PHP. I've read it before and it made me sad that I ever used to say that PHP as a language was just fine.
Aug
8
comment Teaching kids to program - how to teach syntax?
+1 for the cheat sheet. Honestly, that's how I program in languages that I'm not familiar with (or, using Python, with functionality I'm not that familiar with since I don't get to use it full time :( - I use the Python documentation as a cheat sheet all the time. Now that I think about it, I also used cplusplus.com all the time when I was in school. That may be the most valuable tool you can teach them - how to Read The Fine(!) Manual.
Aug
8
comment Teaching kids to program - how to teach syntax?
Teach them Python - When you can write your first program with print("Hello World"), it's hard to get any more simple than that. Plus the fact that you program in basically any idiom (functional, OO, procedural), makes the language great for a first time.
Aug
8
comment Do I need to use an interface when only one class will ever implement it?
@LaminSanneh, elaborated. Does that help?
Aug
8
revised Do I need to use an interface when only one class will ever implement it?
added explanation of interfaces
Aug
8
comment How big does my project need to be for me to unit test it?
There are at least two other types of testing - integration test, and acceptance tests. Unit tests cover a specific unit (e.g. this function of this class is supposed to Frab the Fizz). You mock/stub all the other places where that class interacts, passing it el fake-o data. When you do integration tests, you combine two (or more) classes to make sure that your classes go together the way you think they should. Eventually you build up enough tests that you're doing end-to-end testing of your entire system, sometimes known as "smoke tests".
Aug
8
comment How big does my project need to be for me to unit test it?
You shouldn't test everything, but you should test any behavior that's exposed to the outside world. There is/are certainly maintenance costs to testing, and as Kent Beck said in some SO answer (I think it was SO) - test enough to make you confident that your code is correct.
Aug
8
comment How big does my project need to be for me to unit test it?
1 line of code? ;)
Aug
8
answered Do I need to use an interface when only one class will ever implement it?
Aug
8
comment Do I need to use an interface when only one class will ever implement it?
@YannisRizos, even if they don't, I think I'd agree with Fabio about the non-violation of YAGNI. My personal opinion about developing in a statically bound language is that if you create a class, it probably needs an interface. The only exception (I've seen) is if the behavior of the class is actually part of another, interface'd class' API (e.g. a UserControl on a View). Then the tests against the interface should expose errors in the other class.
Aug
8
comment Do I need to use an interface when only one class will ever implement it?
This why I love dynamically bound languages - Unless you're checking isinstance(), all you care about is that whatever came in has the function/method/property you want to look at. Of course that makes good testing a priority... but requiring good practice isn't exactly a criticism...
Jul
10
answered What if globals make sense?
May
25
awarded  Nice Answer
May
25
comment How to become a super user (programming)?
@MadsAndersen, just because you don't get (grade?) credit, doesn't mean you get no credit.
May
25
comment How to become a super user (programming)?
@JamesYoungman, wish I could upvote your comment twice :P
May
17
comment Worst coding standard you've ever had to follow?
We use this style in our COBOL code on z/OS. No subversion (or better) tools there.
May
16
comment Why is Mercurial considered to be easier than Git?
@progo, that's besically the crux of the issue. Mercurial has great Windows support, git doesn't. I've heard rumor that's by design - git windows improvements are discouraged by Linus... but, [citation needed] of course.
Apr
25
awarded  Excavator
Apr
25
revised Python - Service, how to get a code review
improved spelling, grammar
Apr
25
suggested approved edit on Python - Service, how to get a code review