938 reputation
916
bio website waynewerner.blogspot.com
location Greenwood, AR
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Jul 23 at 2:06

I'm a husband to my beautiful wife, father to our children, Computer Science graduate from University of Central Arkansas. I love my wife, our children, computers, playing guitar (especially singing/playing for my wife and/or kids), bicycling (including taking my kids for rides in my bike trailer), woodworking, airbrushing, digital and traditional artistry, playing games with my family (traditional and digital), my poor Chevette that I had to sell, throwing knives, firearms, knot tying, rope making, whip making, and really just learning new stuff in general. If I don't know about it I probably want to learn about it, if only so I can make informed decisions about it.

My three favorite programming languages are Python, Lisp, and Assembly (though I'm not sure about the order of those last two languages...), and I currently develop in .NET languages, especially VB.

I think the CANSPAM act is one of the dumbest pieces of legislation in the history of the universe

Code I can write/read (where 1 is just barely, 3 is the average user, and 10 is the language designer/guru level):

  • Python - 6/10
  • C++ - 4/10
  • Perl - 3/10
  • Assembly - 3/10
  • HTML/JavaScript - 5/10
  • VB.NET - 5/10
  • C# - 5/10
  • Befunge - 2/10


Aug
8
comment Do I need to use an interface when only one class will ever implement it?
@YannisRizos, even if they don't, I think I'd agree with Fabio about the non-violation of YAGNI. My personal opinion about developing in a statically bound language is that if you create a class, it probably needs an interface. The only exception (I've seen) is if the behavior of the class is actually part of another, interface'd class' API (e.g. a UserControl on a View). Then the tests against the interface should expose errors in the other class.
Aug
8
comment Do I need to use an interface when only one class will ever implement it?
This why I love dynamically bound languages - Unless you're checking isinstance(), all you care about is that whatever came in has the function/method/property you want to look at. Of course that makes good testing a priority... but requiring good practice isn't exactly a criticism...
Jul
10
answered What if globals make sense?
May
25
awarded  Nice Answer
May
25
comment How to become a super user (programming)?
@MadsAndersen, just because you don't get (grade?) credit, doesn't mean you get no credit.
May
25
comment How to become a super user (programming)?
@JamesYoungman, wish I could upvote your comment twice :P
May
17
comment Worst coding standard you've ever had to follow?
We use this style in our COBOL code on z/OS. No subversion (or better) tools there.
May
16
comment Why is Mercurial considered to be easier than Git?
@progo, that's besically the crux of the issue. Mercurial has great Windows support, git doesn't. I've heard rumor that's by design - git windows improvements are discouraged by Linus... but, [citation needed] of course.
Apr
25
awarded  Excavator
Apr
25
revised Python - Service, how to get a code review
improved spelling, grammar
Apr
25
suggested suggested edit on Python - Service, how to get a code review
Apr
25
comment How do I review my own code?
Concerning the check-list, having a spec is super useful.
Apr
25
comment How do I review my own code?
@KevinReid, I would love to see some stats on abandoned SE posts - especially ones that people have been typing for longer than 60s on. I know I've done that same thing myself at least 5 times.
Feb
29
comment What metrics do you use on your Scrum project?
I upvoted because I think it's a valuable answer, though I'd make the (hopefully) obvious comment that tests should be good tests. Otherwise you just end out with a metric that's just as useful as Lines of Code.
Feb
29
comment What can I expect when moving from University to a real programming job?
@Nick, they taught best practices at your University??? :-o
Feb
23
comment Other than for legacy software, are there reasons for using COBOL?
+1, very expensive indeed. Plus pointing out that Java is becoming the New Cobol - which I've seen myself and I'm just a young buck, so it's interesting to see someone with experience make the same observation.
Feb
23
comment Other than for legacy software, are there reasons for using COBOL?
I can emphatically state that your certainty is misplaced - we have several younger (20-30s) new hires writing new Cobol code (updating and/or copying and modifying existing systems), and we have at least 10% of our ~200 developers who spend 80%+ of their development time in Cobol. I think you'd find that most places who use Cobol are exactly the opposite to what you describe.
Feb
23
comment Other than for legacy software, are there reasons for using COBOL?
At our company we pretty much copy/paste existing code, tweak it to suit our needs, and say "done". Luckily I get to do my development in C#/VB
Feb
23
comment Other than for legacy software, are there reasons for using COBOL?
Honestly, I don't have that much of a problem with Cobol - I more or less enjoy the syntax and some of the language features (and when preparing textual reports, its formatting can't be beat). The only thing I really hate is working in the gosh-awful editor on the IBM Z/OS mainframe. I'd rather use ed... (in all seriousness, I would. The man page is much better and it's kinda fun to code that way. And it's way easier to navigate than whatever editor we have on our mainframe...)
Feb
23
comment How is quality important to the programmer, the person?
I don't think that looking at potential issues necessarily equates to writing quality code. I think code that 1) performs the task and 2) is easy to maintain and 3) is bug free would be what I consider a quality job. Unless the requirement stated it needed to consider all potential issues (in which case I'd require more specific requirements about what "all potential issues" were.)