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May
12
awarded  Nice Answer
May
12
revised What do you call an iterator that returns the current, previous and next siblings of each node of a list?
added 260 characters in body
May
12
revised What do you call an iterator that returns the current, previous and next siblings of each node of a list?
added 591 characters in body
May
12
comment What do you call an iterator that returns the current, previous and next siblings of each node of a list?
+1 for node, which is most likely the intended usage of this data-structure.
May
12
revised What do you call an iterator that returns the current, previous and next siblings of each node of a list?
deleted 23 characters in body
May
12
answered What do you call an iterator that returns the current, previous and next siblings of each node of a list?
May
10
comment Are there constraints for functions in structured programming?
Or maybe he doesn't want student to use printf/scanf because he expects them to use C++ constructs: count, cin?
May
10
comment Are there constraints for functions in structured programming?
My guess is that the instructor said Structured programming.
May
7
comment Java: why is there a Comparator interface but no Hasher and Equator?
+1, but note that there are OO languages where multiple dispatch exists (Smalltalk, Common Lisp). So always is too strong in the following sentence: "in OO, you always call a method on one single object".
Apr
30
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
30
revised Commit at a logical checkpoint only, or also when you're at a stopping point?
added 9 characters in body
Apr
30
revised Commit at a logical checkpoint only, or also when you're at a stopping point?
deleted 13 characters in body
Apr
30
revised Commit at a logical checkpoint only, or also when you're at a stopping point?
deleted 13 characters in body
Apr
30
revised Commit at a logical checkpoint only, or also when you're at a stopping point?
added 658 characters in body
Apr
30
revised Commit at a logical checkpoint only, or also when you're at a stopping point?
added 2 characters in body
Apr
30
comment Commit at a logical checkpoint only, or also when you're at a stopping point?
@ThomasStringer I agree that there is little benefits. I like stashing because commands are very short to type, and because it looks more like WIP than a normal commit.
Apr
30
comment Commit at a logical checkpoint only, or also when you're at a stopping point?
@Krystian This does not matter, since everything you do on your own local copy is, well, local (I assume you don't share your computer with someone else). You could even commit on master, as long as you don't push in-progress work. That's how I work with git-svn, for example (I also use local branches).
Apr
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
30
comment Commit at a logical checkpoint only, or also when you're at a stopping point?
@Bergi Commits should be atomic units of change, and for the benefits of other people who will read the log (which includes future 'you'), it is sometime better to edit intermediate commits, with an interactive rebase, for example. I am not saying every push should be one big commit; on the contrary, it is easier to have a chain of (as small as possible) commits that have a clear purpose.
Apr
30
comment Commit at a logical checkpoint only, or also when you're at a stopping point?
@LowFlyingPelican The third kind of failure is human error. More often that I would like to admit, I managed to delete files or revert uncommitted local changes. I don't recommand pushing upstream either.