863 reputation
512
bio website schoolofficepro.com
location United States
age 41
visits member for 4 years, 7 months
seen Apr 8 at 14:38

Giving advice and other "help" because, well, why not?


Apr
8
comment Why are people making tables with divs?
@Vilx: no. The differences will be noticeable with a couple simple divs that have borders, padding, margins and a bit of text within them. The primary thing is how the box model works. The majority of the time people try to compensate for lousy doctype selection by using css reset sheets that attempt to set margins and padding to zero.
Apr
6
comment Why are people making tables with divs?
@Vilx: It's trivial for you to test various doctypes. Rather than depend on us, just put together a few examples and see how they are rendered in various browsers. It's priceless education.
Apr
2
comment Why are people making tables with divs?
@vilx: html 5 didn't drop the whole thing. Rather, a new doctype was added. Point is, that very first line that appears at the top of the html document is critical and if you don't understand what it does and how the various browsers react to it then you'll spend far too much time figuring out why your layout is "broken" in a particular browser.
Apr
2
comment Why are people making tables with divs?
@Vilx: A doctype puts a browser into a certain mode. Among other things, it defines the box model in use. For a number of doctypes the browsers didn't line up because the box model used was different. This is why so many developers complained that the browsers showed pages differently and rather than fix the doctype, used massive css reset sheets. However, there have been a few doctypes in which all the browsers used the same box model - but those were never the default, you had to know them.
Apr
1
answered Why are people making tables with divs?
Apr
1
comment Why are people making tables with divs?
@JuhaUntinen: That's not entirely accurate. The table rendering engine was slower when you used percentages for column widths as the entire table had to be downloaded before the browser could start figuring out how big to make everything. This was over complicated by nested tables. However, there were then (and still exist) ways to make table rendering FAR FAR faster. Just very few devs bother to learn their craft well enough and instead jump on bandwagons.
Sep
22
awarded  Yearling
Sep
4
answered Are mutliple database calls really significant with a network call for a web API?
Aug
21
comment How to avoid being forked into oblivion by a more powerful contributor?
You state that people are conflating the legal and ethical situation and even say that Ethically it's more complicated, but you don't give any reasons to back up those statements. In other words what do you see as an ethical complication in forking the software?
Aug
13
comment Has there really not been one thing in the past 20 years that provided huge software development gains?
I agree: the single improvement in technology that led to an order of magnitude increase in productivity was code reuse. The internet though is a wash. On the one hand it's far easier to get quick information in a timely matter, on the other it can be a huge time suck.
Mar
3
comment What should I do when I've already waited too long between commits?
On a personal level I agree that you shouldn't do large commits unless you are radically changing a code base.. at which point you should have branched it anyway. However we're talking about a single programmer that has been working essentially disconnected and is now trying to get back to doing the right thing. In that case I believe one large commit is preferable.
Feb
27
answered What should I do when I've already waited too long between commits?
Feb
27
comment Able to read Code but struggling majorly to write it
Embrace your inner Nike and "just do it".
Jan
4
comment Bump version number in commercial software development?
Disagree that version matters most to developers. Most software companies happily increase the version number once a year in order to convince customers to "upgrade" whether they need to or not.
Jan
4
comment Date as software version number
Also, date based versions are no more "flat" than "2.1.3". Neither have meaning without context. For most VCS's pulling out a set of files by date is generally more reliable than pulling out by a label. For the simple reason that people sometimes forget to stamp a particular set of files with a version label while the VCS never forgets to date/time stamp the update.
Jan
4
comment Date as software version number
Having multiple releases a day doesn't equate to having a release problem. What it might indicate is that you have a large project, where several people/groups are constantly working to release updates. These might be fixes or simply enhancements.
Jan
4
comment Date as software version number
I'd argue that features often get pushed from one release to another and therefore any documentation given to a customer that "feature x will be in release 2" is likewise doomed to failure.
Jan
4
comment Date as software version number
We also have continuous deployment, and we use a major version + the date. It's simply the easiest way to keep track of what's going on. Quite frankly it's easier to query version control to pull out the source files for a given date than it is to constantly have to tag files and query that way.
Nov
22
asked Approach to algorithm for assignment of resources
Nov
22
awarded  Informed