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seen Mar 12 '11 at 3:42

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awarded  Notable Question
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comment How to recruit programmers for an open source project and kick-start it?
@mathepic When a project gets billed as "built by X" when he was just 1 of a team of 10 people who started it and contributed to it, then yes the other 9 are not getting "true credit for what they're really doing". Programmers are people and no matter how much we believe in open source, we can still smell a ripoff situation when we're put in one.
Oct
17
comment How to recruit programmers for an open source project and kick-start it?
@mathepic Hmm, where did I say that "hes not going to do any work himself"? I said "you only worked 10% of the initial project and brought others to carry the load and teach you"
Oct
13
comment How to recruit programmers for an open source project and kick-start it?
I didn't post this as an answer because you said you didn't want a "you shouldn't" type of an answer like this, and that you "want to go that way anyway".
Oct
13
comment How to recruit programmers for an open source project and kick-start it?
So understand that open source projects are created by highly motivated, highly technical, highly hard working people, and the rest see the benefit they're getting from their leadership and choose to jump on the bandwagon and start contributing "back". So just saying, you have to put a lot of hard work leading first. As others have told you, you'll be hard pressed to find many projects that started the way you're describing.
Oct
13
comment How to recruit programmers for an open source project and kick-start it?
Also, in the first couple of months, someone might (or will) disagree and take off and rebuild the idea into their separate project (even a commercial application if they wanted), because in the first 6 months, not much code has been written yet so those who don't like the group can rewrite the whole thing themselves and start their own project. This way they also get true credit for what they're really doing.
Oct
13
comment How to recruit programmers for an open source project and kick-start it?
For example, who owns the trademark to this project. You think you? Can't be, you only worked 10% of the initial project and brought others to carry the load and teach you, so you're definitely not the leader and that trademark doesn't make sense to be yours. Others aren't stupid and they're not your slaves you know. They all did the main work. It doesn't make sense to bill this project as "your open source project".
Oct
13
comment How to recruit programmers for an open source project and kick-start it?
My guess is that you can't get an open source project done yourself and you're finding it a lot of work, and that's why you're coming with that "collaborative project from the start". Sorry to say it like this. But realize that most people jump on the bandwagon only after the project (and its leader) have proved their merits as history of open source shows. Otherwise you're just entering into a venture with equal partners and have very little say. It's not "your own open source project" anymore.
Oct
11
comment At what age could I reasonably teach my children about programming?
OS, MS-Word, some web-skills have nothing to do with programming. Just because you can watch TV and know how to use the remote doesn't make you an electrical engineer. If you want to teach your kid about electrical engineering, you need to give them something to "build" like a small robot or an interesting simple circuit. Same for software, so your example is really trivializing software engineering too much.
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revised What are the benefits of using database abstraction by ORM?
deleted 7 characters in body
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answered Do libraries and frameworks swing more on the GPL or MIT side?
Sep
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comment Do libraries and frameworks swing more on the GPL or MIT side?
I don't agree with this. If you want to use a GPL project in a commercial application or closed source application, all you have to do as I said in the other comment is agree with the library creator on a reasonable sum to waive the license for you. This is how GPL libraries can force money making companies to pay their dues. If these commercial companies don't even want to do that, they're scumbags out to eat other people's lunch.
Sep
28
comment Do libraries and frameworks swing more on the GPL or MIT side?
Not sure I agree with this. It looks like they are looking for a free lunch. If they want to use GPL libraries, they only have to pay the creator a reasonable sum to waive the GPL requirement for them. I understand this is not possible with "code that the FSF holds the copyright to" because the FSF is using GPL in pure idealistic ways, but other developers see the GPL as a way to protect their economic benefits if the code is used in a commercial project. If these guys don't want to pay to waive the license, they're looking for a free lunch to get fat.