Marnen Laibow-Koser
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1d
comment Are there serious companies that don't use version-control and continuous integration? Why?
@siliconrockstar For what it's worth, most Rails projects I've worked on have had excellent developer test coverage (the exceptions were actively trying to improve it); not all have had formal QA. It's much less necessary to have formal QA with good tests, though it's still a very good idea. However, development without tests in place is incredibly risky, so that's why I say that improving tests should be prioritized over anything else.
1d
comment Are there serious companies that don't use version-control and continuous integration? Why?
@siliconrockstar I was talking about having a good test suite for your own code; appropriate level of testing for library code is quite another matter.
Aug
20
comment Are there serious companies that don't use version-control and continuous integration? Why?
And you'll probably want to focus on a good test suite before you start worrying about QA, or anything else.
Apr
19
comment Do you dress formally or casually for a programming interview?
I haven't worn a suit to a tech interview in years. I wear nice "business casual" clothes. The advice to always wear a suit is at least 10 years out of date.
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Feb
18
comment Rewriting GPL code to change license
That would be Xerox PARC, not Bell Labs.
Apr
2
comment Must developers understand the business domain or should the specification be sufficient?
That's not my main point of disagreement. My main point of disagreement is your claim that access to a domain expert will not help programmers figure out what they need to build. In fact, it is exactly this access that will most help programmers -- and I know because I've done this very thing on various projects.
Apr
2
awarded  Commentator
Apr
2
comment Must developers understand the business domain or should the specification be sufficient?
As a freelancer, I assure you that I have to understand my clients' businesses at least well enough to talk to them intelligently about the features they want. The idea that you can write a spec without understanding the business is a pipe dream. So is the idea that you can write a perfect spec and throw it "over the wall" to a developer.
Apr
2
comment Must developers understand the business domain or should the specification be sufficient?
"For the same reason, even expert programmers with no domain knowledge are powerless at figuring out what they needs to build, even when they have a 24x7 access to the best domain expert who is not also an expert at software development." -- No. The programmers get the domain knowledge (in part) by interviewing the domain expert. The domain expert can tell the programmers what he wants built. The programmers should learn enough about the domain to be able to discuss features with the domain expert.
Mar
24
answered Are there serious companies that don't use version-control and continuous integration? Why?
Oct
10
comment What's the worst programming book you've ever read?
I'm surprised the Pragmatic folks aren't just advising everyone to switch to Git.
Oct
10
comment What's the worst programming book you've ever read?
UML is horrible. How would one write a good book on it? :)
Oct
10
comment What's the worst programming book you've ever read?
The interesting thing is that Ed Yourdon is an otherwise reasonable, well-respected author, or so I understand. He just made a colossal blunder with his estimation of the impact here.
Oct
10
comment What's the worst programming book you've ever read?
Yikes. I'll have to find a copy of this just out of morbid curiosity.
Oct
10
comment What's the worst programming book you've ever read?
And the emphasis on Web programming? WTF? Who the heck uses C++ for that?
Oct
10
comment What's the worst programming book you've ever read?
Many O'Reilly books -- perhaps most -- are excellent. But not all are...
Aug
15
awarded  Supporter
Aug
15
awarded  Teacher
Aug
14
comment Is SQL important if I know ORM frameworks well?
High-level languages are built in such a way that they prevent you from having to know about the underlying architecture, true. That's possible because the domain is commensurable with the underlying architecture. ORMs, however, are a different matter. I'm a huge fan of ORMs, but I don't think a day will ever come when you can use one without knowing SQL (or whatever the underlying DB uses). The object and relational models are fundamentally incommensurable, and I think there will always be concepts that don't translate from one to the other. Besides, I'm talking about today's ORMs, not future