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seen Aug 23 at 2:17

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awarded  Yearling
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14
awarded  Notable Question
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Dec
21
comment Are all security threats triggered by software bugs?
Relevant: homepage.ntlworld.com./jonathan.deboynepollard/FGA/…
Dec
21
comment Is there a modified LGPL license that allows static linking?
0mq is also licensed under LGPL with an explicit static linking exception.
Dec
21
comment How to efficiently store IP addresses?
Define "efficiently". Fast for storage? Fast for retrieval? Efficient in terms of memory usage? Does this question actually have anything to do with IP addresses, or are you just asking for a data storage system?
Oct
18
awarded  Popular Question
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Jan
20
comment Development setup for TDD. Is it correct?
Early on, we had some projects which were concerned about that, and for those, we had the CI server send out a "Build still good" mail after 'n' number of consecutive successful commits (typically 20). But later on we made build status screens as you mention in your post, and those would have made it really clear if the CI server had ever stopped picking up new commits for any reason.
Jan
19
comment Development setup for TDD. Is it correct?
We also found that it made a surprisingly huge difference if broken-build mails contained the generated build errors. And if your CI server is fast enough to keep up with all the commits, then including the name of the person who broke the build made a mammoth difference in how often builds became broken in the first place, since nobody wanted their name to be sent in one of those mails.
Jan
19
comment Development setup for TDD. Is it correct?
After several years of development with a continuous integration server, we found that the important mails were: (a) A mail for each commit where the build becomes broken. (b) A mail when the build is still broken. (c) A mail when the build is fixed. That is, if commit 10 breaks the build, commit 11 has an unrelated new feature added (but the full build is still broken), and commit 12 fixes the build, then commit 10 gives a "The build has become broken" mail, commit 11 gives a "The build is still broken" mail, and commit 12 gives a "The build is working again" mail.
Jan
14
comment How do I know if the compiler broke my code and what do I do if it was the compiler?
I agree with Crashworks, when talking about game consoles. It's not unusual at all to find esoteric compiler bugs in that specific situation. If you're targetting normal PCs, though, using a heavily-used compiler, then it's very unlikely that you'll bump into a compiler bug that nobody's seen before.
Jan
14
revised Should you bring up commercial projects in an interview?
Fixed a spot where I said "competitor" when I meant "employer". Oops!
Jan
7
revised Should you bring up commercial projects in an interview?
deleted 29 characters in body
Jan
7
comment Should you bring up commercial projects in an interview?
+1 I love your example interview answer. Fantastic example of how to sell a negative experience as a positive for a new employer.
Jan
7
answered Should you bring up commercial projects in an interview?
Jan
5
comment Best way to get programmers to ask for help when they get stuck
True story: About a half hour ago, I was stuck trying to fix a bug. Eventually, I took a break from banging my head against the codebase and went to browse programmers.stackexchange.com to get inspiration, and I saw this question. At least in my case, your asking of this question was the perfect way to inspire a programmer to ask for help when stuck; I probably would have gone on banging my head against the codebase for hours on my own, otherwise.