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  • 0 posts edited
  • 2 helpful flags
  • 19 votes cast
Apr
12
comment Is duplicate syntax for defining named functions a bad language design decision?
@mpen Yeah, actually javascript essentially does the same thing. the function fnName()... form does in fact create a constant, which is what makes hoisting a valid thing to do with it. Javascript makes things pretty confusing tho when you use the form var fn = function anotherFnName()... since that makes the name anotherFnName not hoist, even tho its clearly constant.
Mar
2
comment Does my Remote Procedure and Event Protocol complete?
Feel free to discuss on github : )
Mar
1
comment Does my Remote Procedure and Event Protocol complete?
Looks like you mostly got it. Some of the things you asked questions about are in the full spec, so I'm not worried about those. The transport protocol could be TCP modified for message chunking or websockets. Also thanks for the typo note. You asked about communication recovery: what kind of accidental interruption are you talking about? My first thought is that the underlying transport protocol used should be the one to worry about that kind of thing.
Mar
1
revised Does my Remote Procedure and Event Protocol complete?
deleted 13 characters in body
Mar
1
awarded  Student
Mar
1
revised Does my Remote Procedure and Event Protocol complete?
added 6 characters in body
Mar
1
asked Does my Remote Procedure and Event Protocol complete?
Mar
1
answered How and where do I publish my open standard?
Aug
17
comment Keep a programming language backwards compatible vs. fixing its flaws
I see your point. I still think its one end of two extremes. If major flaws become apparent in an unsupported version of of a language, it may be along the lines of that version ceasing to exist, because no one will want to use it.
Aug
16
comment Keep a programming language backwards compatible vs. fixing its flaws
I don't think that's a problem with the analogy, that was actually my point. Facebook has chosen the "fixing the flaws" route and has mostly eschewed the "backwards compatibility" route. Which is why they don't have a legacy version of their API. Its a perfect example of one extreme.
Jul
11
comment What's wrong with circular references?
The definition of naive algorithms is that they crash in edge cases. This isn't the fault of the edge case, its the fault of the naive algorithm.
May
14
answered Testing multi-threaded race conditions
May
2
comment Why almost no webpages hash passwords in the client before submitting (and hashing them again on the server), as to “protect” against password reuse?
This is in no way secure. What you are doing is generating a new password based on the user's password and sending that to the server. If someone obtains the hashed password they can send that directly to the server as the password. Downvoted. No one should ever do this
Aug
19
revised Keep a programming language backwards compatible vs. fixing its flaws
added 40 characters in body
Aug
19
revised Keep a programming language backwards compatible vs. fixing its flaws
added 934 characters in body
Aug
19
answered Keep a programming language backwards compatible vs. fixing its flaws
Jul
16
comment What negative consequences can arise from this language design rule?
@jco You might be interested in the SO chatroom I started talking about my programming language Lima chat.stackoverflow.com/rooms/57376/lima
Jul
16
revised Is duplicate syntax for defining named functions a bad language design decision?
deleted 1 character in body
Jul
16
answered Is duplicate syntax for defining named functions a bad language design decision?
Jul
15
awarded  Commentator