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seen Sep 17 '11 at 2:06

Sep
23
awarded  Yearling
Sep
23
awarded  Yearling
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awarded  Caucus
Sep
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awarded  Yearling
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awarded  Student
Feb
4
comment Easy way of engaging non-programmers (i.e. designers) into using version control?
Regarding the "repository bloat": you can try to work around that with the right file formats. Documentation stored in a document markup language format and graphics stored in a graphics markup language format instead of the equivalent binary formats can help a lot. Of course the viability of this depends on the project in question and the willingness and competence of the involved people. ;)
Jan
30
comment “Do you have any questions for us?” In an interview
@sglantz: The reason why I'd ask such questions is to avoid getting stuck at a company that is too cheap to shell out e.g. 200$ for a specific editor and forces you to waste your hours with a badly-designed or buggy free/cheap replacement (disclaimer: this is no bash against OSS :P). Or a company that makes you work on an outdated computer where a build takes 5 minutes instead of 20 seconds. Considering how much hardware/tools cost and how much your working time costs, there's absolutely no reason to not buy the best equipment/tools for the job.
Jan
23
comment What arguments are there against easter eggs? Are there any arguments to even support easter eggs?
@Anon: Thanks for the heads up. I edited my answer and reordered the paragraphs, detailing the reasons against EE in the first part.
Jan
23
revised What arguments are there against easter eggs? Are there any arguments to even support easter eggs?
reorganized paragraphs, added more detailed explanation of reasons against EE
Jan
23
comment What arguments are there against easter eggs? Are there any arguments to even support easter eggs?
@Anon: From the Wikipedia article I mentioned in my answer: "Microsoft, who has in the past created some of the largest and most elaborate Easter eggs such as the ones in Microsoft Office, no longer allows Easter eggs in their software as part of their Trustworthy Computing initiative." The source for that statement is the MSDN blog article linked in Charles' answer. I don't see any contradiction to my statement. Could you please explain where I got it wrong? :)
Jan
23
answered What arguments are there against easter eggs? Are there any arguments to even support easter eggs?
Jan
14
comment When is a BIG Rewrite the answer?
+1 for mentioning Hofstadter's Law.
Jan
13
answered Consistency of an object
Nov
3
comment “Do you have any questions for us?” In an interview
@brian_d: I think you can instead ask questions along the lines of "What tools do you use and why?" and follow ups like "Why are you using tool X instead of tool Y which (does something better | has a better usability | offers more features | ...)?" If you then get answers like "Because it's (free | cheap)" instead of a good technical reason you can mark it down as a big "NO!" on your list.
Nov
1
comment Not specifying a return in a function, good or bad?
@TheLQ: guessing from the syntax I'd say that's Objective-C.
Oct
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
26
comment Why does adding more resource to a late project make it later?
@Henry: the problem is that you usually can't optimize that aspect to a degree where it's not the bottleneck. A new programmer at first knows exactly 0 about your project, your code and your processes. It's the same overhead that's always required when adding a new team member. But when a project is already running late the team often doesn't have the time to do a proper introduction, and if it does that time is missing from the actual development. Therefore it's usually a lose-lose situation for the team and the new person takes much longer until he can contribute meaningfully to the project.
Oct
26
comment What do you do with a heisenbug?
@SnOrfus: in that case you could perhaps try to arrange some sort of screen sharing session with the user. During that session he would only try to reproduce the issue. Depending on how long it actually takes for a single usage of the functionality it may take a while but would give you a chance of seeing the bug "live in action". Also, if the bug reports are missing some details you could ask for more detailed reports - perhaps the user is doing something he thinks has nothing to do with the bug but that is actually important.
Oct
26
comment Why does adding more resource to a late project make it later?
+1 for adding resources to testing, not development.
Oct
26
answered Why does adding more resource to a late project make it later?