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C# developer, pretty standard stuff. SOLID and other such principles drive everything I do for the most part. Other than that, polyglot lover of functional programming in Haskell, F#, Erlang, and javascript. Player of each, master of none.

  • Monads are like buckets, that's what they say anyway.
  • Monoids are easy! I guess?
  • Comonads are just objects... however that works O_o
  • Cartography has nothing to do with these things.

Cheers.


3h
comment Does the company own my work?
No, they own you. Keep your kidneys in good shape and eat your vitamins, and you might get a raise for increasing their capital valuation!
May
19
comment How do I know when I understand enough Category Theory for programming?
This question will be closed, not because category theory is bad (it's quite good!), but because it simply doesn't make sense and you don't know that. The reason being: Category Theory is related to Programming like Thermodynamics is to auto maintenance. There's a relation, sure, if you understand Thermodynamics/Category Theory very well, it may make you a better auto mechanic/programmer, but the majority of programmers/auto mechanics know nothing of category theory/thermodynamics, and they don't have to one little bit. Since it's not necessary at all, your question doesn't make sense.
May
18
revised How do I override the Type of members in a base class from the derived class?
added 120 characters in body
May
18
revised How do I override the Type of members in a base class from the derived class?
Replaced entire lot of nonsense
May
18
revised How do I override the Type of members in a base class from the derived class?
Replaced entire lot of nonsense
May
16
revised At what size of data does it become beneficial to move from SQL to NoSQL?
edited tags
May
16
revised pre aggregating documents mongodb
edited tags
May
16
revised Content CDNs and dynamic content
edited tags
May
16
revised Is this what “Cloud-Scaling” is?
edited tags
May
16
revised 500 databases or 1 database with 500 tables or just 1 table with all the records?
edited tags
May
16
revised What happens when one reaches their framework's maximum requests per second?
edited tags
May
16
comment What makes functional programming languages declarative as opposed to Imperative?
@ALXGTV Declarations define relationships, relationships are malleable; if x = 1 + 2 then x = 3 and x = 4 - 1. Sequenced statements define instructions so when x = (y = 1; z = 2 + y; return z;) you no longer have something malleable, something the compiler can do in multiple ways - rather it's imperative the compiler do what you instructed there, because the compiler can't know all side effects of your instructions so it can't alter them.
May
16
comment What makes functional programming languages declarative as opposed to Imperative?
@ALXGTV the difference between that declaration and an imperative style is that if that mathematical expression were statements, it would be imperative that they be executed as written. However because it is not a sequence of imperative statements but rather an expression that defines a what you want, because it doesn't say how, it's not imperative that it be executed as written. Therefore the compile can reduce the expressions or even memoize it as a literal. Imperative languages do this too, but only when you put it in a single statement; a declaration.
May
15
revised What makes functional programming languages declarative as opposed to Imperative?
added 537 characters in body
May
15
answered What makes functional programming languages declarative as opposed to Imperative?
May
15
comment What makes functional programming languages declarative as opposed to Imperative?
One of the keys to recognizing the difference is when you're using an assignment operator, vs. a definition/declaration operator - in Haskell for instance there is no assignment operator. The behaviour of these two operators is very different and forces you to design your code differently.
May
13
comment XML Parsing or text parsing
The most efficient way is to use assembly; or perhaps a design a chip to do it. You need to be more descriptive in your goals and constraints than "best" or "most efficient"
May
6
comment Algorithm to find whether there is a path (any path) above length X between two vertices
worst case will always be exhaustive because you don't know if there's more than one path to your target node at all. Tons of applicable heuristics though... just don't expect anything better than worst case exhaustive.
May
6
comment Algorithm to find whether there is a path (any path) above length X between two vertices
Do you allow cycles in the path? Should definitely mention that. (I presume you don't want to otherwise it's easy)
May
6
comment Algorithm to find whether there is a path (any path) above length X between two vertices
Please leave this Q here if you repost it to comp-sci. It's a good question for this site as well as comp-sci, and you're likely to get good answers on both sites.