690 reputation
1612
bio website
location
age
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Aug 19 at 8:46

Jun
10
comment Is it normal for programmer to work on multiple projects simultaneously
Then I think you are very fortunate... However, I suspect that I'm in the bigger demographic who have to take the rough with the smooth.
Jun
5
comment Is it normal for programmer to work on multiple projects simultaneously
I did - but to think every aspect of every job is going to be exciting is naive.
Jun
28
comment Should you keep a copy of all the code you write?
@DexterHuinda My wife doesn't like my code collection either... :(
Jun
26
comment Should you keep a copy of all the code you write?
Apart from not agreeing with your comparison there (500 hrs down to 20 hrs is wishful thinking), but you also fail to consider what the employee might have brought into his job that this employer would benefit from. It cuts both ways.
Jun
26
comment Should you keep a copy of all the code you write?
The second item assumes that there would be an open source solution, which is far from certain. But most importantly, some of the code I've retained is code that demonstrates how I've used 3rd party components/services. For example, if I develop a decent payment solution that integrates with Paypal, I'll take the code to refer to later - so I don't need to re-invent the wheel next time.
Jun
25
comment Should you keep a copy of all the code you write?
@Krelp - why are you quoting US law? A fair proportion of us do not live in the US. I appreciate your sentiments, but this is an international forum, and you need to be mindful that some parts of the world do things differently.
Jun
25
comment Should you keep a copy of all the code you write?
@Malfist - in my jurisdiction, if you develop the code in company time, or as a consequence of your employment, the company own the IP. Likewise, the 3 elements that I developed in my own time, for my own purposes, that my current employer uses, is entirely my property. I advocate taking selective copies of your code (for reference), but it's important to be aware of the legal implications in your jurisdiction.
Jun
25
comment Should you keep a copy of all the code you write?
@Caleb - my previous employer gave me the CDs to write the code to. And no they didn't try to tap me for technical support. I almost certainly took code that someone else contributed in some way to... As for the legal angle, I think some people are a little confused. In my jurisdiction, the company owns the intellectual property and the right to use the code - they don't own every printout or binary.
Jun
25
comment Should you keep a copy of all the code you write?
I've just discussed this with my wife; she works in a completely unrelated sector, but she agrees that this happens in her sector - and everywhere else too. You don't take binaries to your next job, you don't even copy-paste source code... but you do cherry-pick the best bits for future reference. And I do think too many people 'doth protest too much'...
Jun
14
comment Is constantly looking for code examples a sign of a bad developer?
As a predominantly solo developer, I don't have any peers to check my code, to work through problems with me, and to inspire me. Examples on the net are essential to me both to solve particular problems and learn new skills/best practice.
Jun
11
comment How to manage a developer who has poor communication skills
+1 - I agree with both points. A developer should be reasonably well-rounded. And with proper support and encouragement, there may be no reason why the guy can't up his game.
Jun
11
comment How to manage a developer who has poor communication skills
Nobody said he was the best programmer. And even if he was, there is nothing to say that requiring he fulfils a broader role is wrong. I agree that being fair doesn't necessarily mean treating everyone as clones - but there may be a middle way, where people are given tasks that suit and interest them, but where they all muck-in with the less glamorous tasks to some extent.
Jun
11
comment How to manage a developer who has poor communication skills
-1: He's not blaming anybody. He's identified that one guy is poorer at communicating, and consequently he managed to dodge some of the more boring jobs that other have to do. I'm not sure how you conclude that this denotes poor management, or the OP struggles to communicate... That said, I totally agree that speaking to the guy in question should form part of any solution.
May
28
comment How much documentation is enough?
Wrong. It means more is not necessarily better. Brevity is to be valued, but clearly not if making something simpler means missing out on useful information. But equally, writing volumes and volumes of documentation might make it harder for another developer to access to the most useful information. When writing documentation, you don't simply need to think about what is still missing, but also what you have that you don't really need.
May
28
comment How much documentation is enough?
He appears to be saying 'do whatever you feel is needed' which sounds like a legitimate answer to me. I would be wary of too many more specific answers.
May
28
comment How much documentation is enough?
@ThorbjørnRavnAndersen. It doesn't; it was a comment in response to your comment- which, for the record, I suspect was a misinterpretation of Benoit's answer. Only Benoit can answer for sure. However, my answer is listed elsewhere...
May
28
comment How much documentation is enough?
@ThorbjørnRavnAndersen - No, perfection is achieved when removing any more content would undermine the worth of the documentation as a whole.
Apr
5
comment How many lines of code can a C# developer produce per month?
@SK-logic - Each line in a translated source document will generally be mapped to a single line in the target document - it's a very linear mapping. When it comes to software, it is unlikely that two programming languages are similar enough in structure and capability to be able to expect the same. There will likely be numerous areas where savings could be made, and some areas, where you will have comparatively more code to write.
Mar
23
comment Variable naming conventions?
@DakotahNorth - it makes sense to have a house style, but beyond that, consistency is the key consideration. As long as the convention isn't too off-the-wall, it can be easily picked up by external/new developers. Indeed, it's worth publishing the house style, to remove any uncertainty.
Mar
23
comment Variable naming conventions?
re: Hungarian notation - sure, in general it should be avoided. But I find it very useful (as do many others) for controls. The only alternative is Ziv's suffixed version which seems to be Hungarian-but-pretending-not-to-be.