1,119 reputation
611
bio website jerrykindall.com
location Seattle, WA
age 46
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen 9 hours ago

I'm a technical writer at Tecplot, Inc., makers of fine data visualization software for aerospace/CFD, oil and gas exploration, and general scientific/engineering uses. Python is my Swiss Army Knife of choice. I use it to help build and validate our documentation and help, among other things. I also have some proficiency with HTML, XML, AppleScript, C#, C, and if anyone ever has a question about 6502 assembly language, I'm your man. :-)


Sep
24
awarded  Yearling
Sep
24
awarded  Yearling
Sep
7
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
17
comment Why don't companies ship multiple modules within a mobile app? Are there concerns about tight coupling?
There's a balance to be struck. If development is too costly, the product simply won't exist, and that's not good for the user either. In any case, Android, like all platforms, has plenty of conveniences for the developer that aren't so good for the user, such as the fact that most apps are developed in Java and so require more powerful hardware to get decent performance than if they were native apps. This means hardware is more costly and batteries don't last as long as in native-app phones.
Jul
15
answered Why don't companies ship multiple modules within a mobile app? Are there concerns about tight coupling?
Sep
25
revised How often do experienced programmers have trouble getting their code to perform its intended purpose?
deleted 4 characters in body
Sep
24
awarded  Yearling
Jun
13
comment In plain English, what is recursion?
Yes, the function a still calls itself, just indirectly (by calling b).
Jun
4
answered Does heavy JavaScript use adversely impact Googleability?
Apr
19
comment does one method overload an other, or are both methods “overloaded”
@leftaroundabout: "Overloading" implies that you're doing more "loading" than usual, so the term is only used when you have more than one function with the same name.
Apr
9
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
8
comment How often do experienced programmers have trouble getting their code to perform its intended purpose?
All bugs are a result of someone's mistake (even if that mistake was not taking appropriate preventive measures), but you're right that the programmer's not always at fault, so I've added some verbiage about this.
Apr
8
revised How often do experienced programmers have trouble getting their code to perform its intended purpose?
added 65 characters in body
Apr
8
awarded  Mortarboard
Apr
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
8
comment How to generate “language-safe” UUIDs?
I once wrote a program that generated passwords for an online service. They were random, but there were a few heuristics that made them sorta pronounceable, so they would be more easily remembered. And these heuristics led to profanity. The solution was as described here: check for vulgar substrings, including those that could be pronounced similarly to vulgar words (e.g. look for FUC and FUK) and regenerate the password. (For giggles, the program wrote the rejected passwords to a separate file.)
Apr
8
revised How often do experienced programmers have trouble getting their code to perform its intended purpose?
added 64 characters in body
Apr
8
revised How often do experienced programmers have trouble getting their code to perform its intended purpose?
added 45 characters in body
Apr
8
answered How often do experienced programmers have trouble getting their code to perform its intended purpose?
Mar
23
awarded  Nice Answer