3,257 reputation
1918
bio website
location Italy
age 49
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen 4 hours ago

Born an living in the suburbs of Milan (Italy), I graduated in 1989 as a Master Electronic Engineer, specializing in information technology an inter-networking systems and plants.

Interested in programming since the early '80s, today working mainly in C++ and D programming languages, in libraries development.


Oct
14
comment Can *any* program task be expressed without state?
@BillyONeal: Sate is something physical. You can see it or hide it, but doesn't disappear. There cannot be something that is both "stateful" and "stateless". You can describe it starting from state (and transformation is a consequence) of from transformation (and state is an implicit prerequisite). If there is no "state" there is either no computation or no time/space/energy.
Oct
14
comment Can *any* program task be expressed without state?
@wirrbel: state is something physical (think to linear differential equations systems or to discrete systems). A state is introduced every time on thing calls another, otherwise no return is possible, since you don't know where you come from. The fact you don't (need to) "reason" about it doesn't make it disappear.
Oct
14
comment How important it is to fix memory leaks?
@VladimirKocjancic: +1 for "feature"
Oct
14
answered Can *any* program task be expressed without state?
Oct
14
comment Can *any* program task be expressed without state?
Your same argument can be reverted saying that being lamba calculus equivalent to touring machines, every computation must have a (more or less hidden) state. Whether is is represented as external to the code (by means of variables) or internal to the flow (by means of stack-based function call) always "state" is.
Sep
11
comment What do you do when a client requires Rich Text Editing on their website?
Links report a 404
Sep
2
awarded  Yearling
Aug
23
comment Defensive Programming vs. Exception Handling
You don't have to cath all what you can handle. Only what you must handle: the cases originated by your own in your function, not the one that are consequence of a bad use of your function. What does this mean in the specific context is something only you can tell.
Aug
23
comment Defensive Programming vs. Exception Handling
That was exactly what I meant
Aug
23
comment Without C++-like destructors, how do we return resources that aren't managed by garbage collector in Java?
Yes, I can even call yourself an object, if you like. Are you human or a compiler?
Aug
23
answered Defensive Programming vs. Exception Handling
Aug
22
comment Without C++-like destructors, how do we return resources that aren't managed by garbage collector in Java?
Today C does, not the C (1989) I was raferring to.
Aug
22
comment Without C++-like destructors, how do we return resources that aren't managed by garbage collector in Java?
In C you don't allocate "objects": malloc allocates memory you use to store data. In C++ new allocates constructed object on the dynamic memory normally allocated via C malloc. The Idea of an Object to construct and destroy comes with C++, not C.
Aug
22
revised Without C++-like destructors, how do we return resources that aren't managed by garbage collector in Java?
edit after OP question edit
Aug
22
comment C++ class with only pure virtual functions: what's that called?
A "protocol" is the "sequence of actions that have to be taken from cooperating interfaces to perform certain tasks". It cannot be a sinonimous of "interface", since it is defined around interfaces. A protocol describes how interface have to be used. an interface describes what an object exposes.
Aug
22
answered Without C++-like destructors, how do we return resources that aren't managed by garbage collector in Java?
May
12
answered Heap overflow vs stack overflow
May
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
20
comment Nested classes vs namespaces
I don't see any nested class ...
Mar
8
comment What non-theoretical, practical programming language has no reserved keywords?
@SK-logic: usually. But what are "identifiers" if you dint't tokenize yet? Since a token is "whatever recognizable sting", "int", "myvalue" and "+" are not different, before a syntax rule had been given. If "+" is not defined as operator, it can be just a name for a thing like whatever other unicode single character string. Operators, by a pure syntax stand point, are nothing more that "single character keywords".