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visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Oct 27 at 0:58

Oct
5
comment Is JavaScript safe?
Much of the web doesn't work with full features without javascript enabled. The wide majority of the public is perfectly fine with any security aspects of javascript being enabled and it enables a much more functional web. So, unless you are building a site that is targeted at the minor portion of users that runs with javascript off, ignore them. I would NOT try to find any wording that tries to convince them to turn javascript on as that element is doing what they want and you can't change their minds. Just tell them that they must have javascript enabled in order to use your web site.
Sep
2
awarded  Yearling
Aug
25
comment What is the “best practice” for converting an external API's data structure?
Again, this is too generic a question. The app should structure its data in what makes the most sense for the app. There are many considerations that go into determining what makes the most sense. How the data must be organized for communicating with an API is only one of those considerations. How the data is used within the app is likely more important, but is just yet another consideration. How the data is stored persistently (if stored persistently) is yet another consideration, security might be another consideration and so on...
Aug
25
comment What is the “best practice” for converting an external API's data structure?
What do you mean "where it should be handled"? The consumer of the API constructs the arguments to an API function themselves. The implementor of the API processes the arguments as the specific implementation sees fit. I guess I don't understand what question you're asking. I'm thinking you need to provide an explicit example that shows several options you might be asking about.
Aug
25
comment What is the “best practice” for converting an external API's data structure?
This seems like far too generic a question. The right structure for sending data to an API depends upon a whole lot of things that are specific to the data, the application, how the data is normally consumed, how the data is transmitted and the specific API function, etc... For example, a Javascript API takes arguments and objects with properties, but a REST API requires most things in string form which may mean JSON.
May
30
revised Image caching when rendering the same images on different pages
Fix spelling in title
May
30
answered Image caching when rendering the same images on different pages
May
30
suggested suggested edit on Image caching when rendering the same images on different pages
May
12
comment JavaScript strict mode compatibility
The only case I can think of is if you're relying on something that is only true in strict mode (such as this === undefined in a regular function call) or relying on something causing an error in strict mode that doesn't cause an error in non-strict mode. Other than those odd things, yes you are correct that strict mode is more restrictive so normal code written in strict mode should work fine in non-strict mode.
May
5
comment How to make your JavaScript private?
If you want to require login for every user of your webpage, this will keep people who don't have the login credentials from using your website.
May
4
comment How to make your JavaScript private?
node.js has absolutely nothing to do with this. All node.js code can be kept private, just like server-side code in PHP, Java, C#, C++, etc...
May
4
comment How to make your JavaScript private?
It's even worse than that. They don't have to change your client-side javascript. They can just issue their own Ajax command to your server.
May
4
comment How to make your JavaScript private?
Yes, anyone can see your jQuery in the browser. But, it can use Ajax to call server side functions that operate your mysql database. Your server side code can be private, not your client-side code.
May
4
comment How to make your JavaScript private?
It sounds like you don't understand that node.js runs on the server and the browser javascript runs on the client. You can't mix the two. You can use any server-side language you want (Python, C++, Java, javascript, PHP, etc...). Only javascript runs in the browser. You can make ajax calls from browser to server if you want.
May
4
comment How to make your JavaScript private?
Can you ask a more specific question? I've written javascript for both browser and node.js.
May
4
comment How to make your JavaScript private?
node.js does not run in a browser. It runs on a server or desktop computer somewhere and usually loads scripts locally. Those scripts can be kept locally because they are never served to a browser.
May
4
answered How to make your JavaScript private?
May
1
comment Should we use any JS framework which makes HTML as scripting language
I guess it is unclear what you are asking then. It sounds like you don't like the thought of a template language that allows you to put some generation logic in with your HTML. But, I'll bow out of the conversation now.
May
1
comment Should we use any JS framework which makes HTML as scripting language
Yes, that is my point. But, in my example, JS would be building HTML for presentation which you seemed to think was a bad thing. In some cases, a server-style template language might even be used in the client. I'm just trying to explain that life is not always as simple as plain HTML served from a server.
May
1
comment Should we use any JS framework which makes HTML as scripting language
Imagine the case where the user in the browser is browsing data and they wish to drill down to see finer and finer views of some piece of data. It can often be advantageous to not serve a new page everytime they ask to see something else, but to instead issue an ajax call, receive some data, turn that data into the appropriate presentation and then add that to the current view in the browser.