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Mar
29
revised How is JavaScript insecure, and what are the main methods used to deal with that?
added 82 characters in body
Mar
29
answered How is JavaScript insecure, and what are the main methods used to deal with that?
Mar
7
comment API access question
It is not clear to me what your objective is. You have a public API. What usage restrictions are you trying to enforce on the public API?
Mar
7
comment API access question
A referrer header can be set to anything by a programmer so it provides no real security.
Feb
6
awarded  Editor
Feb
6
revised Returning an object or false in dynamic languages
added 78 characters in body
Feb
6
answered Returning an object or false in dynamic languages
Jan
13
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
10
comment Should web browsers include popular web framework libraries?
@Deanos - The browser would have to build in very specific knowledge of a few things to look for and where to look for them (like jQuery versions from the Google CDN). It would save a small amount of page load time the first time that resource was needed, but it would use more total bandwidth anytime a cached item or version of that cached item was never needed. I suspect the benefits are relatively small vs. complexity or Google probably would have already tried it in Chrome with their own CDN. Keep in mind that things can live in the disk cache for a long time.
Jan
10
awarded  Commentator
Jan
10
comment Should web browsers include popular web framework libraries?
@maple_shaft - I don't understand what you're proposing. If a web-site not following best practices (since that's what you seem to be talking about) puts a jQuery version on their own site and includes it from there, how is the browser supposed to make that more efficient than it is today?
Jan
10
comment Should web browsers include popular web framework libraries?
@Deanos - duh, if the browser had the exact right version of jQuery built-in, it could save a page request, but all the issues in my answer still apply. The browser can only build-in the version of jQuery that exists at the time the browser is distributed. From then on, it's out-of-date and the browser cache is how it caches newer versions.
Jan
10
comment Should web browsers include popular web framework libraries?
@maple_shaft - how does that help you? Aren't all releases of jQuery on the Google CDN already? What are you asking for beyond that and how does it help you? Doesn't good web design practice already call for using one of the most common CDNs to promote use of a cached version of jQuery?
Jan
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
10
comment Should web browsers include popular web framework libraries?
@Deanos - what would the browser use it for?
Jan
10
answered Should web browsers include popular web framework libraries?
Dec
31
comment Comma as a separator vs. comma as a delimiter
@Giorgio - I don't like the extra trailing comma either. I have no idea why it's different for arrays vs. arguments.
Dec
30
comment Comma as a separator vs. comma as a delimiter
It seems like people are hung up on a semantic issue. We've known for years and years that older versions of IE don't accept a trailing comma after the last array element. This is just a fact. Therefore, if you want your code to work, you can't put that extra comma. That means that you need to think of commas as separators (they only go between elements, not after the last element). This is NOTHING new and has been required for good interoperability for a long time. Just because ECMA5 has now made that trailing comma legal doesn't change how you have to code for interoperability.
Dec
30
awarded  Supporter
Dec
30
comment Comma as a separator vs. comma as a delimiter
Why does this matter?