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location Porto Alegre, Brazil
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visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Jul 7 at 20:22

Jul
3
comment File exists vs. File does not exist. Is there a difference in performance?
The third case (early termination) is called "guard clause".
Jul
3
comment File exists vs. File does not exist. Is there a difference in performance?
The second form might be semantically used to denote a guard clause: refactoring.com/catalog/…
Jun
18
comment How to transition from “help vampire” to “developer”?
Agreed. From my small personal experience, I think we won't stop learning new technologies, as they come and go all the time, but the most important knowledge in my opinion has to do with architecture, dependency and complextity management, etc. These apply to every platform.
Jun
16
awarded  Critic
Jun
11
comment Continuing to code on large projects
+1. One possible way to get this middle approach is to think/design top-down, and code bottom-up. Then you can code deepest, more elementary components first (those without dependencies), and then going up taking advantage of encapsulation and higher-level interfaces to keep complexity tractable on each layer.
Jun
10
comment Continuing to code on large projects
I'm currently doing this in a BLOG I created only to guide development step by step. I don't even care if someone reads it (by the way it is in portuguese). Besides documentation, the very rationale of "why and how" you design the system is something worth writing about (not only thinking about inside your head). +1
Jun
10
comment Continuing to code on large projects
I have a story similar to yours with pet-projects I do at home as a hobby. The most paralyzing sensation is not being sure of what use the "system" will have when it's "ready". I mean, everything "can" be done if you really want to, but is it really necessary, or is it really the RIGHT thing to do? So my advice is: choose something you fell will make a difference to someone, even if this someone is only you. Of course, if you work as a developer, applying every best-practice imagineable is the best exercise you can get.
Jun
10
comment Why is the function called lseek(), not seek()?
From what @ysap suggests, lseek would be "long" seek, that is, it returns a long (64bit) offset.
Jun
9
comment What is the origin of the negative term “Legacy Code”
Given also my current job experience, in my company we tend to think about "legacy code" as production code developed by people no longer in the company. Code that we are somewhat FORCED to use because (it works AND (we don't quite understand it enough to replace it OR it has created dependencies we cannot currently eliminate)). If it is undocumented, or nobody knows even how or why it works, then it has a VERY bad conotation (not by the code per se, but for the fact that such situation has come to happen).
Jun
6
comment Any advice from self-taught programmers on competing with more conventional types?
Regarding "work standing for your credibility", there is a famous quote from a century-old bicycle saddle manufacturer: "It is not the name of Brooks which makes the saddle good, but the saddle, and its excellence, that makes the name supreme." (Brooks Saddles, 1912)
Dec
12
comment How can I structure my code when I have orthogonal arrays of features?
I have a very similar problem. Our product is a data acquisition system with lots of different sensors. There is a hardware layer, a GUI layer, a calibration layer... Each time I have to add a sensor to the codebase, I have to spray a bit of code in every layer... Very un-natural and error prone...
Aug
30
comment How would I design an interface such that it's clear which properties may change their value, and which will remain constant?
@proskor I don't think the OP asked for such thing... But I understand the general rationale, and sure it might matter depending on context... And for your answers, at least in C# you might put some code in the getters of properties.
Aug
30
comment How would I design an interface such that it's clear which properties may change their value, and which will remain constant?
@proskor Well, most languages maybe, but doesn't C# (the language mentioned in the question) allows for that? There are quite a handful of specifiers like virtual, final, protected, readonly and so on...
Aug
30
comment How would I design an interface such that it's clear which properties may change their value, and which will remain constant?
I was wondering: do interfaces "have the power" to impose such behavior? Shouldn't this behaviour be delegated to each implementation? I think that if you want to enforce things to that level, you should consider to create an abstract class so that subtypes would inherit from it, insead of implementing a given interface. (by the way, does my rationale make sense?)
Aug
5
comment What to do with old programming books?
Also, if the ink itself contain any toxic substance (heavy metals come to mind), even if the paper decomposes, it would make for a very bad compost... Hard to know, I think!
Aug
4
comment What to do with old programming books?
Origami is the perfect exemple of a resource-hungry activity that depends on actual paper. (is there such a thing as an "origami school"?)
Aug
4
comment What to do with old programming books?
I think even in less-favoured countries, where programming would supposedly be learned in machines with internet, the cost of learning old knowledge from old paper is larger than looking for new information online, even if it doesn't come from a book. IMO.
Aug
4
comment What to do with old programming books?
Besides... codinghorror.com/blog/2012/04/books-bits-vs-atoms.html
Jul
24
awarded  Commentator
Jul
24
comment Best Practices for calculating data in GIS-like web application
"But, right now, after reading some docs and pages, I can see clearly, that I may be wrong." Do you have any actual reference to support this impression? Which docs and which pages?