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Apr
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awarded  Guru
Mar
16
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
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awarded  Guru
Feb
26
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
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awarded  Taxonomist
Jan
31
awarded  Great Answer
Jan
19
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
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awarded  Guru
Nov
23
comment Can I use GPL, LGPL, MPL licensed packages with my application and make it closed source?
Just a note, but... BusyBox (uppercase 'b') is not a Window Manager. I think you got confused with *Box, line of WMs, like Openbox, Blackbox, Fluxbox, etc... (all lowercase 'b') BusyBox is a single piece of software (more specifically, a bootstrap system) combining several UNIX tools. I'm sure that was just a confusion.
Nov
23
comment Can I use MIT licence plugins in my commercial web site?
@this: The usual (both correct and decent) thing to do is to include, as part of your software, the terms of this license carrying the original author's name and copyright notice, and a note as to what it refers to. Depending on your software's form, this can be either in a LICENSE file, a "About..." dialog, or an information page, as long as it's bundled and visible with your software. (again, IANAL).
Nov
23
comment Can I use MIT licence plugins in my commercial web site?
@this: Copyright and authorship are inalienable, and are not the same as a license. A license (like MIT) lays the terms for the use and distribution by a 3rd party. Copyright is implicit and inalienable. Though the MIT/X11 license gives you the right to reuse (in full or partly, modified or unaltered) a piece of sofware licensed that way, and to redistribute it (in both commercial or non-commercial forms, closed-source or open-source), you are not allowed to claim that that specific piece of code is yours. That being said, MIT is vague about giving attribution.
Sep
25
awarded  Yearling
Sep
14
comment Should images be stored in a git repository?
@Jez: re: GitLab: about.gitlab.com/2015/04/08/… and about.gitlab.com/2015/02/17/… . Hope this helps.
Sep
14
comment Should images be stored in a git repository?
@Jez: Alternatively, other hosts might allow large file support. BitBucket doesn't yet, but using Atlassian Stash I think you can enable large file support for Mercurial. Or deploy your own Mercurial solution on a PaaS yourself and add Large File Support. For Git-based solutions, GitLab might support that, not sure.
Sep
14
comment Should images be stored in a git repository?
@Jez: for bitbucket, vote on this issue: bitbucket.org/site/master/issues/3843/….
Sep
7
comment Should images be stored in a git repository?
@Jez: "Worst case, if you have tons, store them somewhere else or use externals or an extension for binary support." and "you shouldn't worry about it - granted you don't store GBs of those." kinda covered that :) Obviously if you start storing a lot of binary data, it's a bad idea. For most small projects, or medium projects where images will be created once and are unlikely to change much for the lifetime of the project, it's acceptable. Still not really a fan though, but that beats having a complicated build setup if you need them. My preference is always text-based image sources though.
Aug
31
awarded  Great Answer
Aug
27
reviewed Leave Open Const means Thread-safe?
Aug
27
reviewed Leave Open Good practice for holding immutable data
Aug
27
reviewed Leave Open How do you approach transitive dependency conflicts that are only known at run-time?