865 reputation
414
bio website tech-thoughts-blog.com
location Paris, France
age 27
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Sep 18 at 13:40

Engineer working mainly on OpenStack with a particular interest in:

  • Quality Assurance
  • Programming Languages
  • Unix Systems
  • Open Source

Sep
27
awarded  Yearling
Sep
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
5
awarded  Good Answer
Sep
27
accepted Functional programming: Writing a small interpreter
Sep
27
awarded  Yearling
Nov
4
accepted What are the security implications of running untrusted code on my server?
Nov
2
asked What are the security implications of running untrusted code on my server?
Sep
27
awarded  Yearling
Sep
21
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
31
asked Are there similarities between operating system kernels and programming language kernels?
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
May
23
answered Working on someone else's code
Apr
18
comment How do you make an open source website and profit?
@tandu: I'm not suggesting you open source. You're the only one who can decide that. I'm only saying that your fears about people stealing your code aren't much justified. Most developers can copy any idea, whether they have access to the code or not. On the other hand, open source brings some strong benefits to the project. Again, you should know whether to open source or not, and more importantly when and how to open source. Open source is only useful if you build a community around your code, and believe me that takes a lot of work!
Apr
17
comment How do you make an open source website and profit?
@Dave, the term back of the box is derogatory. Some of the best code in the world is open source. Especially in web dev. I'll stop before being accused of being a fanboy. tandu: unless your idea is radically different (as in redefining web altogether), any group of people could copy your idea in a few days, no matter how complicated it is. People have been implementing Twitter-likes as an exercise way before they open sourced their code. Being first, being robust and being new is what makes success.Not your "secret recipe"
Feb
5
awarded  Commentator
Feb
5
comment How to find siblings of a tree?
I don't think lines of code should be an indication of the complexity of an exercise. A language like Scheme or even Python would fit perfectly for this kind of situation and would probably resolve the issue in half what you wrote. Again, certain programmers parse trees every day, multiple times a day. I guess they wanted to test if you're that kind of programmer or not (for the record, there's absolutely nothing wrong in not being that kind, if only that you probably don't match the requirements for the position).
Feb
5
answered How to find siblings of a tree?
Feb
5
awarded  Peer Pressure
Oct
26
comment Why is Java considered more portable than other languages like C++?
+1 for that last sentence!
Oct
25
answered Transitioning into a programming career from system administration