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Jul
16
awarded  Guru
Jul
16
comment Do objects in OOP have to represent an entity?
@Dennis - yes communication between objects is a good place to focus. Sometimes I prefer to start from the responsibility angle, but they tend to lead toward the same place. To steal from Twain “I didn't have time to write a short comment, so I added to the answer instead.”
Jul
16
revised Do objects in OOP have to represent an entity?
Objects are about messages
Jul
14
revised Is there a practical way to manage a physical task board if one or more scrum team members works remotely?
so many typos!
Jul
11
answered Is there a practical way to manage a physical task board if one or more scrum team members works remotely?
Jul
10
revised Do objects in OOP have to represent an entity?
more about bags of methods
Jul
8
comment Do objects in OOP have to represent an entity?
@Dennis Whether an object "contains" a kind of data or just "modifies" a specific kind of data is an implementation detail. You can do OO without classes, without inheritance, and without member variables. The core idea for me is that these things (data and behavior) go together and can be encapsulated = object. The "problem" with generic bags of behavior is that they generally have too many responsibilities to be considered a cohesive object.
Jul
8
comment Do objects in OOP have to represent an entity?
@BenAaronson I feel like you can evolve to that object as cohesive concept with enough concerted effort, but I have found a tendency for an entity-focus to force things together that should be apart. Entities encourage boundaries in our names, which is good, but they also bring along this notion of correctness/completeness, which tends to hurt. In the most ridiculous terms, I'm for a FirstNameValidator object and against a Name object that also does validation for first and last names.
Jul
8
awarded  Good Answer
Jul
8
awarded  Mortarboard
Jul
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
8
answered Do objects in OOP have to represent an entity?
Jun
29
comment How do I design a subclass whose method contradicts its superclass?
Despite 13 years as a java developer, I've very rarely found a compelling reason to create a class hierarchy in ruby. What are you trying to accomplish that requires more than modules and duck typing? Most rubyists would scream the first time a subclass did anything that contradicted the parent.
Sep
27
awarded  Yearling
Sep
6
comment Do else blocks increase code complexity?
@AssortedTrailmix Right, you're thinking about else semantically, code analysis tools usually look for extraneous instructions because they often highlight a misunderstanding of control flow. The else after an if that returns is wasted bits. if(1 == 1) often triggers the same sort of warning.
Sep
6
answered Do else blocks increase code complexity?
Jul
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
7
reviewed Approve What does 'stage' mean in git?
Jul
4
answered How many mistakes does a good software developer make?
May
31
reviewed Edit Should I create separate work and personal GitHub accounts?