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Jan
17
comment Will we go back(?) to fixed-point arithmetic in the near future?
@JohnR.Strohm: Fixed point numbers ALWAYS HAVE the binary point in the same place. That's why they are called FIXED-point. So addition and subtraction are simple. What does make it headache though is that you always have to think about overflow or underflow on multiplication and division.
Jan
17
comment Is there already a “Binder” data-structure?
Do you have a specific algorithm in mind? Because I can't think of anything appropriate that wouldn't be adequately served by the traditional structures.
Jan
17
comment Is there already a “Binder” data-structure?
I'd consider migrating this to cs.se. The data structure in question is rather specialized and I am not sure it is even possible.
Jan
17
comment Is there already a “Binder” data-structure?
Being somewhat trained in functional programming I'd take the copying algorithm over the mutating one anytime. Because it can be implemented in terms of local function and generic mapcat/monadic bind functor. Makes it easily parallelisable among other things.
Jan
17
comment Will we go back(?) to fixed-point arithmetic in the near future?
@BЈовић: Floating point multiplication and division are also faster than integral ones on x86+x87 at least since pentium. And on x86+x87 they were always done in 10-byte long double precision.
Jan
17
comment Will we go back(?) to fixed-point arithmetic in the near future?
Fixed point operations normally means that the operations are done in integers in suitable fractions of the unit. So the position of decimal/binary point is always the same. So the programmer is not doing any bookkeeping. But of course it quickly looses precision when the numbers are of different order.
Jan
17
comment What is casting supposed to mean?
In C pointer casts are always reinterpret and value casts always preserve value as best possible. In C++ there are multiple ways to do pointer cast, which is why there are the more explicit cast types.
Jan
16
revised Syntactic Sugar for old languages
added 441 characters in body
Jan
16
comment Syntactic Sugar for old languages
There are two languages where the point is to have C. GOB and Vala.
Jan
16
revised Syntactic Sugar for old languages
added 536 characters in body
Jan
16
answered Syntactic Sugar for old languages
Jan
14
comment What are the most important concepts to understand for “fluency in developer English”?
The link does not seem to work anymore.
Jan
13
revised How do you move beyond code examples without a project?
added 130 characters in body
Jan
13
answered How do you move beyond code examples without a project?
Jan
13
comment Is it sufficient to use acceptance and integration tests instead of unit test?
Automating testing and unit testing are completely orthogonal matter. Any self-respecting project will have automated integration and functional testing. Granted, you don't often see manual unit tests, but they can exist (basically manual unit test is a testing utility for some specific functionality).
Jan
9
revised Using Ubuntu for commercial software development
added 4 characters in body
Jan
9
revised Using Ubuntu for commercial software development
deleted 1 characters in body
Jan
9
answered Using Ubuntu for commercial software development
Jan
8
comment Use null object as argument to method
@KarlBielefeldt: Of course. But cleanest code in C++ does not have virtual all over the place.
Jan
8
comment Use null object as argument to method
This is a good technique in fully polymorphic language like Java, but in C++ polymorphism is often not the preferred approach. E.g. the virtuals are more likely slower than the null pointer check.